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Gender gaps in salary negotiations: Salary requests and starting salaries in the field

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  • Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence of gender gaps in negotiation behavior and in subsequent outcomes from a unique large sample of high-stakes salary negotiations between recent college graduates and prospective employers. Although females state salary requests to a larger extent than males do, they ask for lower salaries, and are offered lower starting salaries also for the same request. These gender gaps are small, yet noteworthy considering the homogeneity of the sample. Notably, the study highlights the importance of negotiation behavior as accounting for females stating lower salary requests largely reduced or even closed the gender pay gap in subsequent starting salaries.

Suggested Citation

  • Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2019. "Gender gaps in salary negotiations: Salary requests and starting salaries in the field," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 35-51.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:161:y:2019:i:c:p:35-51
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2019.01.019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Negotiation behavior; Gender; Salary requests; Gender pay gap;

    JEL classification:

    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • M52 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Compensation and Compensation Methods and Their Effects
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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