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What determines the part-time and gender earnings gaps in Britain: evidence from the workplace

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  • Karen Mumford
  • Peter N. Smith

Abstract

This study examines the role of individual and workplace characteristics in accounting for differences in hourly earnings between men and women in full and part-time jobs in Britain. A four-way gender-working time split (male full-timers, male part-timers, female full-timers, and female part-timers) is analysed, and allowance is explicitly made for workplace and occupational female segregation. Within gender groups, the striking difference between full and part-time employees is that full-timers work in higher paying occupations than do part-timers. Also, female occupational segregation makes a significant contribution to the earnings gap between male and female part-time employees but not for full-time workers. A further new result is that female workplace segregation contributes significantly to the full/part-time earnings gap of both males and females. Part-time employees work in more feminized workplaces and their earnings are lower. There remains, moreover, a substantial residual gender earnings gap between male and female employees. Copyright 2009 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Karen Mumford & Peter N. Smith, 2009. "What determines the part-time and gender earnings gaps in Britain: evidence from the workplace," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(suppl_1), pages 56-75, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:61:y:2009:i:suppl_1:p:i56-i75
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpn041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Card, David & Cardoso, Ana Rute & Kline, Patrick, 2013. "Bargaining and the Gender Wage Gap: A Direct Assessment," IZA Discussion Papers 7592, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Semih Tumen & Tugba Zeydanli, 2016. "Social interactions in job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(3), pages 426-455, June.
    4. Butcher, Tim & Mumford, Karen A. & Smith, Peter N., 2016. "Workplaces, Low Pay and the Gender Earnings Gap in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 10453, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Gerry H. Makepeace & Michael J. Peel, 2013. "Combining information from Heckman and matching estimators: testing and controlling for hidden bias," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, pages 2422-2436.
    6. Elsayed, A.E.A. & de Grip, A. & Fouarge, D., 2014. "Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK," Research Memorandum 011, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    7. Urban Sila & Ricardo Sousa, 2014. "Windfall gains and labour supply: evidence from the European household panel," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), pages 1-27.
    8. Raul Ramos & Esteban Sanromá & Hipólito Simón, 2015. "An analysis of wage differentials between full- and part-time workers in Spain," Working Papers XREAP2015-02, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Aug 2015.
    9. Humburg, Martin & van der Velden, Rolf, 2015. "Skills and the graduate recruitment process: Evidence from two discrete choice experiments," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 24-41.
    10. Yekaterina Chzhen & Karen Mumford, "undated". "Gender Gaps Across the Earnings Distribution in Britain: Are Women Bossy Enough?," Discussion Papers 09/27, Department of Economics, University of York.
    11. Elsayed, A.E.A. & de Grip, A. & Fouarge, D., 2014. "Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
    12. Chzhen, Yekaterina & Mumford, Karen, 2011. "Gender gaps across the earnings distribution for full-time employees in Britain: Allowing for sample selection," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 837-844.

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