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Parenthood and Productivity of Highly Skilled Labor: Evidence from the Groves of Academe

  • Krapf, Matthias

    ()

    (University of Zurich)

  • Ursprung, Heinrich W.

    ()

    (University of Konstanz)

  • Zimmermann, Christian

    ()

    (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

We examine the effect of pregnancy and parenthood on the research productivity of academic economists. Combining the survey responses of nearly 10,000 economists with their publication records as documented in their RePEc accounts, we do not find that motherhood is associated with low research productivity. Nor do we find a statistically significant unconditional effect of a first child on research productivity. Conditional difference-in-differences estimates, however, suggest that the effect of parenthood on research productivity is negative for unmarried women and positive for untenured men. Moreover, becoming a mother before 30 years of age appears to have a detrimental effect on research productivity.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7904.

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Length: 64 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7904
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