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The Career Costs of Children

  • Adda, Jérôme
  • Dustmann, Christian
  • Stevens, Katrien

This paper analyzes the life-cycle career costs associated with child rearing and decomposes their effects into unearned wages (as women drop out of the labor market), loss of human capital, and selection into more child-friendly occupations. We estimate a dynamic life-cycle model of fertility, occupational choice, and labor supply using detailed survey and administrative data for Germany for numerous birth cohorts across different regions. We use this model to analyze both the male-female wage gap as it evolves from labor market entry onward and the effect of pro-fertility policies. We show that a substantial portion of the gender wage gap is explainable by realized and expected fertility and that the long-run effect of policies encouraging fertility are considerably lower than the short-run effects typically estimated in the literature.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2123/8068
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Paper provided by University of Sydney, School of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2011-13.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:syd:wpaper:2123/8068
Contact details of provider: Postal: Sydney, NSW 2006
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Web page: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/economics
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  38. George-Levi Gayle & Robert A. Miller, 2002. "Life-Cycle Fertility and Human Capital Accumulation," GSIA Working Papers 2003-16, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
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