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English Proficiency and Labor Market Performance: Evidence from the Economics Profession

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Abstract

This paper investigates whether the global spread of the English language provides an inherent advantage to native English speakers. This question is studied within the context of the economics profession, where the impact of being a native English speaker on future publishing success is examined. English speakers may have an advantage since they are writing in their native language, the quality of writing is a crucial determinant of publishing success, and all the top economics journals are published in English. Using a ranking of the world's top 2.5% of economists, this paper confirms that native English speakers are ranked 100 spots higher (better) than similar non-native English speakers. A variety of extensions examine and dispel other potential explanations.

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  • William W. Olney, 2015. "English Proficiency and Labor Market Performance: Evidence from the Economics Profession," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-05, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  • Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2015-05
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    1. repec:aea:jeclit:v:56:y:2018:i:1:p:115-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2018. "Citations in Economics: Measurement, Uses, and Impacts," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 56(1), pages 115-156, March.
    3. Damien Besancenot & Kim Huynh & Francisco Serranito, 2015. " Thou shalt not work alone ," CEPN Working Papers hal-01175758, HAL.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    English Language; Research Output; Economist Rankings;

    JEL classification:

    • F60 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - General
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists

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