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Two to Tango? Gender Differences in the Decisions to Publish and Coauthor


  • John M. McDowell
  • Larry D. Singell
  • Mark Stater


The existence of old boy networks has long been postulated as a possible explanation for the presence of gender differences in market outcomes but with little empirical support because of the difficulty of measuring network access. This article exploits the unique attributes of academic labor markets and detailed data on individuals and jobs for PhD economists over nearly four decades. The results suggest that networks impact the joint decision to publish and coauthor, that these network effects differ by gender, and that gender differences in network access change over time as women become more well represented in a profession. (JEL J44, J77, J24) Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. McDowell & Larry D. Singell & Mark Stater, 2006. "Two to Tango? Gender Differences in the Decisions to Publish and Coauthor," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 44(1), pages 153-168, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:44:y:2006:i:1:p:153-168

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Donald Siegel & Zvi Griliches, 1992. "Purchased Services, Outsourcing, Computers, and Productivity in Manufacturing," NBER Chapters,in: Output Measurement in the Service Sectors, pages 429-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Wolfgang Keller, 1997. "Trade Patterns, Technology Flows, and Productivity Growth," International Trade 9702001, EconWPA.
    3. Hine, Robert C & Wright, Peter W, 1998. "Trade with Low Wage Economies, Employment and Productivity in UK Manufacturing," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1500-1510, September.
    4. Pirotte, Alain, 1999. "Convergence of the static estimation toward the long run effects of dynamic panel data models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 151-158, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Colleen Manchester & Debra Barbezat, 2013. "The Effect of Time Use in Explaining Male–Female Productivity Differences Among Economists," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 53-77, January.
    2. Matthias Krapf, 2015. "Age and complementarity in scientific collaboration," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 751-781, September.
    3. Snell, Clete & Sorensen, Jon & Rodriguez, John J. & Kuanliang, Attapol, 2009. "Gender differences in research productivity among criminal justice and criminology scholars," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 288-295, May.
    4. Krapf, Matthias & Ursprung, Heinrich W. & Zimmermann, Christian, 2017. "Parenthood and productivity of highly skilled labor: Evidence from the groves of academe," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 147-175.
    5. David Colander & Jessica Holmes, 2007. "Gender and graduate economics education in the US," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 93-116.
    6. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:1:p:202-222 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:spr:scient:v:103:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1574-x is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Joya Misra & Laurel Smith-Doerr & Nilanjana Dasgupta & Gabriela Weaver & Jennifer Normanly, 2017. "Collaboration and Gender Equity among Academic Scientists," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(1), pages 1-22, March.
    9. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2015. "Age, Cohort and Co-Authorship," IZA Discussion Papers 8828, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Clemens B. Fell & Cornelius J. König, 2016. "Is there a gender difference in scientific collaboration? A scientometric examination of co-authorships among industrial–organizational psychologists," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(1), pages 113-141, July.
    11. Bransch, Felix & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2017. "Male Gatekeepers Gender Bias in the Publishing Process?," IZA Discussion Papers 11089, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    13. Rhoten, Diana & Pfirman, Stephanie, 2007. "Women in interdisciplinary science: Exploring preferences and consequences," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 56-75, February.
    14. van Rijnsoever, Frank J. & Hessels, Laurens K., 2011. "Factors associated with disciplinary and interdisciplinary research collaboration," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 463-472, April.
    15. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:5:p:911-924 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:spr:scient:v:112:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2386-y is not listed on IDEAS
    17. William W. Olney, 2017. "English Proficiency And Labor Market Performance: Evidence From The Economics Profession," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 202-222, January.
    18. Julia Muschallik & Kerstin Pull, 2016. "Mentoring in higher education: does it enhance mentees’ research productivity?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 210-223, April.
    19. Abramo, Giovanni & D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea & Murgia, Gianluca, 2013. "Gender differences in research collaboration," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 811-822.
    20. Lungeanu, Alina & Huang, Yun & Contractor, Noshir S., 2014. "Understanding the assembly of interdisciplinary teams and its impact on performance," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 59-70.
    21. Abramo, Giovanni & Cicero, Tindaro & D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea, 2015. "Should the research performance of scientists be distinguished by gender?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 25-38.
    22. Anne Boring, 2015. "Gender Biases in student evaluations of teachers," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-13, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity


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