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Six Decades of Top Economics Publishing: Who and How?

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

Abstract

Presenting data on all full-length articles published in the three top general economics journals for one year in each of the 1960s through 2010s, I analyze how patterns of co-authorship, age structure and methodology have changed, and what the possible causes of these changes may have been. The entire distribution of number of authors has shifted steadily rightward. In the last two decades the fraction of older authors has almost quadrupled. The top journals are now publishing many fewer papers that represent pure theory, regardless of sub-field, somewhat less empirical work based on publicly available data sets, and many more empirical studies based on data assembled for the study by the author(s) or on laboratory or field experiments.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Six Decades of Top Economics Publishing: Who and How?," NBER Working Papers 18635, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18635
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    18. Charles E. Scott & John J. Siegfried, 2017. "American Economic Association Universal Academic Questionnaire Summary Statistics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 678-680, May.
    19. Charles E. Scott & John J. Siegfried, 2017. "American Economic Association Universal Academic Questionnaire Summary Statistics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 678-680, May.
    20. Charles E. Scott & John J. Siegfried, 2017. "American Economic Association Universal Academic Questionnaire Summary Statistics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 678-680, May.
    21. Charles E. Scott & John J. Siegfried, 2017. "American Economic Association Universal Academic Questionnaire Summary Statistics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 678-680, May.
    22. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:5:p:678-80 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B20 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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