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Co-authorship and research productivity in economics: Assessing the assortative matching hypothesis

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  • Besancenot, Damien
  • Huynh, Kim
  • Serranito, Francisco

Abstract

This paper estimates the relation between the size and quality of scientists’ co-author networks and individual characteristics (notably productivity) in the context of institutional changes in French academia in the mid-1980s. The analysis employs the Two-Stage Residual Inclusion (2SRI) framework to handle endogeneity in individual productivity relative to the quality of co-authors. The main finding is that the size and quality of authors’ networks are positively related to their productivity; this is understood as evidence of assortative matching. Other effects on co-author networks (such as life-cycles, specialties fields) are also identified. Our results have important policy implications as it indirectly demonstrates the effectiveness of career incentives linked to publication.

Suggested Citation

  • Besancenot, Damien & Huynh, Kim & Serranito, Francisco, 2017. "Co-authorship and research productivity in economics: Assessing the assortative matching hypothesis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 61-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:61-80
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2017.05.018
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    A14; C25; D83; I23; Co-authorship; Count data; Zero inflate models; Instrumental variables; h index;

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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