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Superstar Economists: Coauthorship networks and research output

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  • Hsieh, Chih-Sheng

    () (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

  • Konig, Michael D.

    () (Centre for Economic Policy Research; Swiss Economic Institute; VU Amsterdam)

  • Liu, Xiaodong

    () (University of Colorado Boulder)

  • Zimmermann, Christian

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis)

Abstract

We study the impact of research collaborations in coauthorship networks on research output and how optimal funding can maximize it. Through the links in the collaboration network, researchers create spillovers not only to their direct coauthors but also to researchers indirectly linked to them. We characterize the equilibrium when agents collaborate in multiple and possibly overlapping projects. We bring our model to the data by analyzing the coauthorship network of economists registered in the RePEc Author Service. We rank the authors and research institutions according to their contribution to the aggregate research output and thus provide a novel ranking measure that explicitly takes into account the spillover effect generated in the coauthorship network. Moreover, we analyze funding instruments for individual researchers as well as research institutions and compare them with the economics funding program of the National Science Foundation. Our results indicate that, because current funding schemes do not take into account the availability of coauthorship network data, they are ill-designed to take advantage of the spillover effects generated in scientific knowledge production networks.

Suggested Citation

  • Hsieh, Chih-Sheng & Konig, Michael D. & Liu, Xiaodong & Zimmermann, Christian, 2018. "Superstar Economists: Coauthorship networks and research output," Working Papers 2018-28, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2018-028
    DOI: 10.20955/wp.2018.028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Adhen Benlahlou, 2018. "Team production," Working Papers halshs-01890771, HAL.
    2. Adhen Benlahlou, 2018. "Team production," Working Papers 1822, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.

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    Keywords

    coauthor networks; scientific collaboration; spillovers; key player; research funding; economics of science;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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