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Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States

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  • Freeman, Richard Barry
  • Huang, Wei

Abstract

By examining the ethnic identity of authors in over 2.5 million scientific papers written by US-based authors from 1985 to 2008, we find that persons of similar ethnicity coauthor together more frequently than predicted by their proportion among authors. The greater homophily is associated with publication in lower-impact journals and with fewer citations. Meanwhile, papers with authors in more locations and with longer reference lists get published in higher-impact journals and receive more citations. These findings suggest that diversity in inputs by author ethnicity, location, and references leads to greater contributions to science as measured by impact factors and citations.

Suggested Citation

  • Freeman, Richard Barry & Huang, Wei, 2015. "Collaborating with People Like Me: Ethnic Coauthorship within the United States," Scholarly Articles 20453995, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:20453995
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andreas Strotmann & Dangzhi Zhao, 2012. "Author name disambiguation: What difference does it make in author-based citation analysis?," Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, Association for Information Science & Technology, vol. 63(9), pages 1820-1833, September.
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    5. William R. Kerr & William F. Lincoln, 2010. "The Supply Side of Innovation: H-1B Visa Reforms and U.S. Ethnic Invention," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(3), pages 473-508, July.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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