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Profiling giants: The networks and influence of Buchanan and Tullock

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  • Etienne Farvaque

    () (LEM - Lille économie management - UMR 9221 - UA - Université d'Artois - UCL - Université catholique de Lille - Université de Lille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Frédéric Gannon

    () (EDEHN - Equipe d'Economie Le Havre Normandie - ULH - Université Le Havre Normandie - NU - Normandie Université)

Abstract

This paper uses network analysis to measure the positions and influences of two prominent academics, James M. Buchanan and Gordon Tullock, founders of public choice theory. First, we recount parallel accounts of their lives. Second, we provide a literature review and outline the standard centrality measures insisting on their relevance in assessing the two authors' roles in a given network. Third, we analyze their respective influences through the lens of network analysis by providing details on the publication records and, overall, co-authorship networks of the two scholars. We also explore their academic genealogy and show in particular that (i) Buchanan and Tullock's careers followed parallel paths and co-founded public choice theory and the journal of the same name, although the two had few common works; (ii) though being apparently very similar as to their centrality in the co-authoring network under scrutiny, their ego-networks were structured very differently, revealing diverse positions in the field and, thus, different influences on the discipline.

Suggested Citation

  • Etienne Farvaque & Frédéric Gannon, 2020. "Profiling giants: The networks and influence of Buchanan and Tullock," Working Papers halshs-02474745, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-02474745
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02474745
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    1. Peter Boettke & John Kroencke, 2020. "The real purpose of the program: a case study in James M. Buchanan’s efforts at academic entrepreneurship to “save the books” in economics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 183(3), pages 227-245, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Buchanan; Tullock; Networks; Co-authorship; Dissertation students; Influence; Public Choice JEL Classification: A14; D85; I23;

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions

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