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Are academics who publish more also more cited? Individual determinants of publication and citation records

  • Clément Bosquet

    ()

    (London School of Economics and Political Science (Spatial Economic Research Center), and Aix-Marseille University (Aix-Marseille School of Economics), CNRS, & EHESS.)

  • Pierre-Philippe Combes

    ()

    (Aix-Marseille University (Aix-Marseille School of Economics), CNRS & EHESS.)

Thanks to a unique individual dataset of French academics in economics, we explain individual publication and citation records by gender and age, coauthorship patterns (average number of authors per article and size of the co-author network) and specialisation choices (percentage of output in each JEL code). The analysis is performed on both EconLit publication scores (adjusted for journal quality) and Google Scholar citation indexes, which allows us to present a broad picture of knowledge diffusion in economics. Citations are largely driven by publication records but also substantially increased by larger research team size and co-author networks.

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File URL: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/sites/default/files/_dt/2012/wp_2012_-_nr_36.pdf
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Paper provided by Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France in its series AMSE Working Papers with number 1236.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1236
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/en

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  1. Sauer, Raymond D, 1988. "Estimates of the Returns to Quality and Coauthorship in Economic Academia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 855-66, August.
  2. McDowell, John M & Smith, Janet Kiholm, 1992. "The Effect of Gender-Sorting on Propensity to Coauthor: Implications for Academic Promotion," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(1), pages 68-82, January.
  3. Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 1986. "What is a Citation Worth?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 200-215.
  4. Stigler, George J & Friedland, Claire, 1975. "The Citation Practices of Doctorates in Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(3), pages 477-507, June.
  5. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Are More Senior Academics Really More Research Productive than Junior Academics? Evidence from Australian Law Schools," Monash Economics Working Papers 47-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  6. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Linnemer, Laurent & Visser, Michael, 2008. "Publish or peer-rich? The role of skills and networks in hiring economics professors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 423-441, June.
  7. Natalia Zinovyeva & Manuel Bagues, 2012. "The Role of Connections in Academic Promotions," Business Economics Working Papers id-12-02, Universidad Carlos III, Instituto sobre Desarrollo Empresarial (INDEM).
  8. Lovell, Michael C, 1973. "The Production of Economic Literature: An Interpretation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 11(1), pages 27-55, March.
  9. Hansen, W Lee & Weisbrod, Burton A & Strauss, Robert P, 1978. "Modeling the Earnings and Research Productivity of Academic Economists," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(4), pages 729-41, August.
  10. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Laurent Linnemer, 2010. "Inferring Missing Citations: A Quantitative Multi-Criteria Ranking of all Journals in Economics," Working Papers halshs-00520325, HAL.
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