IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mos/moswps/2012-47.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Are More Senior Academics Really More Research Productive than Junior Academics? Evidence from Australian Law Schools

Author

Listed:
  • Vinod Mishra
  • Russell Smyth

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between academic seniority and research productivity for a sample of academics at Australian law schools. To measure research productivity we use both publications in top law journals, variously defined, and citation metrics. A feature of the study is that we pay particular attention to addressing the endogeneity of academic rank. To do so, we use a novel identification strategy, proposed by Lewbel (2012), which utilizes a heteroscedastic covariance restriction to construct an internal instrumental variable. Our main finding is that once endogeneity of academic rank is addressed, more senior academics at Australian law schools do not publish more articles in top law journals, irrespective of how top law journals are defined, than their less senior colleagues. However, Professors continue to have greater impact than Lecturers when research productivity is measured in terms of total citations and common citation indices, such as the h-index and g-index.

Suggested Citation

  • Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Are More Senior Academics Really More Research Productive than Junior Academics? Evidence from Australian Law Schools," Monash Economics Working Papers 47-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2012-47
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2012/4712moreseniormishrasmyth.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:taf:jnlbes:v:30:y:2012:i:1:p:67-80 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Francesco Lissoni & Jacques Mairesse & Fabio Montobbio & Michele Pezzoni, 2011. "Scientific productivity and academic promotion: a study on French and Italian physicists," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 253-294, February.
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:93:y:2012:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-012-0729-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:scient:v:82:y:2010:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-009-0037-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:69:y:2006:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-006-0154-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Clive R. Belfield & Inas Rashad Kelly, 2012. "The Benefits of Breast Feeding across the Early Years of Childhood," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 251-277.
    7. repec:spr:scient:v:69:y:2006:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-006-0144-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Michael Rauber & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2008. "Life Cycle and Cohort Productivity in Economic Research: The Case of Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9, pages 431-456, November.
    9. Joseph J. Sabia, 2007. "The Effect of Body Weight on Adolescent Academic Performance," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 871-900, April.
    10. Inas Kelly & Dhaval Dave & Jody Sindelar & William Gallo, 2014. "The impact of early occupational choice on health behaviors," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 737-770, December.
    11. Gonzalez-Brambila, Claudia & Veloso, Francisco M., 2007. "The determinants of research output and impact: A study of Mexican researchers," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1035-1051, September.
    12. Siegfried, John J & White, Kenneth J, 1973. "Financial Rewards to Research and Teaching: A Case Study of Academic Economists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 309-315, May.
    13. repec:spr:scient:v:88:y:2011:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-011-0426-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Tom Coupé & Valérie Smeets & Frédéric Warzynski, 2006. "Incentives, Sorting and Productivity along the Career: Evidence from a Sample of Top Economists," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 137-167, April.
    15. David L. Anderson & John Tressler, 2008. "Research Output in New Zealand Economics Department 2000-2006," Working Papers in Economics 08/05, University of Waikato.
    16. Joseph J. Sabia, 2007. "Reading, Writing, And Sex: The Effect Of Losing Virginity On Academic Performance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 647-670, October.
    17. John Tressler & David L. Anderson, 2012. "Citations as a Measure of the Research Outputs of New Zealand's Economics Departments: The Problem of 'Long and Variable Lags'," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 19(1), pages 17-40.
    18. Kevin Denny & Veruska Oppedisano, 2010. "Class size effects: evidence using a new estimation technique," Working Papers 201051, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    19. Carayol, Nicolas & Matt, Mireille, 2006. "Individual and collective determinants of academic scientists' productivity," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 55-72, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes, 2013. "Are academics who publish more also more cited? Individual determinants of publication and citation records," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 97(3), pages 831-857, December.
    2. repec:spr:scient:v:103:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1523-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:spr:scient:v:103:y:2015:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1537-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:scient:v:102:y:2015:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1430-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:105:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1759-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:spr:scient:v:101:y:2014:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1326-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Vinod Mishra & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Academic Inbreeding and Research Productivity in Australian Law Schools," Monash Economics Working Papers 46-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:spr:scient:v:98:y:2014:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-013-1052-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:spr:scient:v:113:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-017-2499-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic rank; Research productivity; Australia; Law;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2012-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Simon Angus). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dxmonau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.