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On the relation between intellectual collaboration and intellectual output: Evidence from the finance academe

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  • Chung, Kee H.
  • Cox, Raymond A.K.
  • Kim, Kenneth A.

Abstract

This paper tests the relation between intellectual collaboration and the quality of the intellectual output using academic papers published in prestigious finance journals during 1988-2005. We use the number of authors of a paper to measure the extent of intellectual collaboration and the number of citations that a paper receives (adjusted by the number of years since the paper's publication) as a measure of its intellectual value. Based on empirical tests, we find that papers with more authors are cited more often. This relation does not hold for purely theoretical papers. Coauthoring with a prolific author leads to higher quality papers, but coauthoring with colleagues at the same institution leads to neither higher nor lower quality papers. Papers with four authors are cited most often. Overall, when it comes to intellectual collaboration, our results counter the notion that "too many cooks spoil the broth."

Suggested Citation

  • Chung, Kee H. & Cox, Raymond A.K. & Kim, Kenneth A., 2009. "On the relation between intellectual collaboration and intellectual output: Evidence from the finance academe," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 893-916, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:49:y:2009:i:3:p:893-916
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bidault, Francis & Hildebrand, Thomas, 2014. "The distribution of partnership returns: Evidence from co-authorships in economics journals," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(6), pages 1002-1013.
    2. David Ong & Ho Fai Chan & Benno Torgler & Yu (Alan) Yang, 2015. "Endogenous selection into single and coauthorships by surname initials in economics and management," CREMA Working Paper Series 2015-01, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Damien BESANCENOT & Kim HUYNH & Francisco SERRANITO, 2015. "Co-Authorship and Individual Research Productivity in Economics: Assessing the Assortative Matching Hypothesis," LEO Working Papers / DR LEO 2236, Orleans Economics Laboratory / Laboratoire d'Economie d'Orleans (LEO), University of Orleans.
    4. Besancenot, Damien & Huynh, Kim & Serranito, Francisco, 2017. "Co-authorship and research productivity in economics: Assessing the assortative matching hypothesis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 61-80.
    5. Francis Bidault & Thomas Hildebrand, 2012. "The distribution of partnerships benefits: Evidence from co-authorships in economics journals," ESMT Research Working Papers ESMT-12-08, ESMT European School of Management and Technology.
    6. repec:eee:jeborg:v:147:y:2018:i:c:p:41-57 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Luis Antonio Orozco Castro, 2015. "Diversidad y heterogeneidad en redes de colaboración científica. Un estudio de las escuelas de administración de América Latina," Books, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Facultad de Administración de Empresas, edition 1, number 44, EJMS Janu.
    8. repec:eee:jbfina:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:26-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Damien Besancenot & Kim Huynh & Francisco Serranito, 2015. "Co-Authorship And Individual Research Productivity In Economics: Assessing The Assortative Matching Hypothesis," Working Papers halshs-01252373, HAL.
    10. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:3:p:577-:d:133294 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:infome:v:12:y:2018:i:1:p:74-86 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:oup:scippl:v:44:y:2017:i:2:p:186-198. is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Kadel, Annke & Walter, Andreas, 2015. "Do scholars in Economics and Finance react to alphabetical discrimination?," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 64-68.

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