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On The Return To Journal Quality, Coauthorship And Author Order Within Top Ranked Agricultural Economics Programs

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  • Hilmer, Christiana E.
  • Hilmer, Michael J.

Abstract

Utilizing an original data set containing annual salaries and peer-reviewed publication histories for 326 faculty members from top-ranked Ph.D.-granting programs we examine the labor market for academic agricultural economists. The results suggest that higher quality publications have a greater impact on annual earnings, that sole authored articles have a higher return than multi-authored articles and that no wage premium exists for being the lead author of a non-alphabetic paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Hilmer, Christiana E. & Hilmer, Michael J., 2004. "On The Return To Journal Quality, Coauthorship And Author Order Within Top Ranked Agricultural Economics Programs," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20179, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea04:20179
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    References listed on IDEAS

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