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Do Academic Salaries Decline with Seniority?

  • Moore, William J
  • Newman, Robert J
  • Turnbull, Geoffrey K
Registered author(s):

    This article reexamines the negative seniority-earnings relationship for academic economists. The empirical results show that the anomalous negative seniority effect found in earlier academic market studies holds in the absence of direct measures of research productivity. The negative effect, however, eventually disappears as more comprehensive measures of publishing, citations, and other productivity measures are included in the wage equation to control for the quantity and quality of faculty productivity. Faculty with greater seniority appear to be rewarded relatively less simply because many have been relatively less productive than their colleagues with less seniority at similar stages in their careers. Copyright 1998 by University of Chicago Press.

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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/209892
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    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 16 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 352-66

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:16:y:1998:i:2:p:352-66
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    1. Sauer, Raymond D, 1988. "Estimates of the Returns to Quality and Coauthorship in Economic Academia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 855-66, August.
    2. Albert Rees, 1993. "The Salaries of Ph.D.'s in Academe and Elsewhere," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 151-158, Winter.
    3. Smith Freeman, 1977. "Wage Trends as Performance Displays Productive Potential: A Model and Application to Academic Early Retirement," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 8(2), pages 419-443, Autumn.
    4. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1979. "Job Matching and the Theory of Turnover," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 972-90, October.
    5. Siegfried, John J & White, Kenneth J, 1973. "Financial Rewards to Research and Teaching: A Case Study of Academic Economists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(2), pages 309-15, May.
    6. Hoffman, Emily P, 1976. "Faculty Salaries: Is There Discrimination by Sex, Race, and Discipline? Additional Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 196-98, March.
    7. Liebowitz, S J & Palmer, J P, 1984. "Assessing the Relative Impacts of Economic Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 77-88, March.
    8. Gordon, Nancy M & Morton, Thomas E & Braden, Ina C, 1974. "Faculty Salaries: Is There Discrimination by Sex, Race, and Discipline?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(3), pages 419-27, June.
    9. Hutchens, Robert M, 1989. "Seniority, Wages and Productivity: A Turbulent Decade," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 49-64, Fall.
    10. Gary S. Becker & George J. Stigler, 1974. "Law Enforcement, Malfeasance, and Compensation of Enforcers," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 1-18, January.
    11. Hallock, Kevin F, 1995. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 654-57, June.
    12. Bell, John G & Seater, John J, 1978. "Publishing Performance: Departmental and Individual," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(4), pages 599-615, October.
    13. Tuckman, Howard P & Leahey, Jack, 1975. "What Is an Article Worth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 83(5), pages 951-67, October.
    14. Ransom, Michael R, 1993. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 221-33, March.
    15. Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 1986. "What is a Citation Worth?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(2), pages 200-215.
    16. Walter Y. Oi, 1962. "Labor as a Quasi-Fixed Factor," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 538.
    17. Siegfried, John J, 1972. "The Publishing of Economic Papers and Its Impact on Graduate Faculty Ratings, 1960-1969," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 31-49, March.
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