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Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market: Comment

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  • Hallock, Kevin F

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  • Hallock, Kevin F, 1995. "Seniority and Monopsony in the Academic Labor Market: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 654-657, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:85:y:1995:i:3:p:654-57
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    Cited by:

    1. Debra A. Barbezat & James W. Hughes, 2001. "The Effect Of Job Mobility On Academic Salaries," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 19(4), pages 409-423, October.
    2. Michael Baker & Gary Solon, 2003. "Earnings Dynamics and Inequality among Canadian Men, 1976-1992: Evidence from Longitudinal Income Tax Records," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 267-288, April.
    3. Barrett, Christopher B. & Bailey, DeeVon, 1999. "Are Agricultural Experiment Station Faculty Salaries Competitively Or Monopsonistically Determined?," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 28(1), April.
    4. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & Geoffrey K. Turnbull, 2002. "The Experience-Earnings Profile: Productivity-Augmenting or Purely Contractual?," Departmental Working Papers 2002-13, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    5. Christiana Hilmer & Michael Hilmer, 2010. "Are There Gender Differences in the Job Mobility Patterns of Academic Economists?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 353-357, May.
    6. Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession," IZA Discussion Papers 64, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Vikas Mittal & Lawrence Feick & Feisal Murshed, 2008. "Publish and Prosper: The Financial Impact of Publishing by Marketing Faculty," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 27(3), pages 430-442, 05-06.
    8. Barbezat, Debra A., 2004. "Revisiting the seniority wage effect for faculty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 289-294, February.
    9. Brown, Byron W. & Woodbury, Stephen A., 1998. "Seniority, external labor markets, and faculty pay," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 771-798.
    10. Carolyn Pitchik, 2008. "Self-Promoting Investments," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 164(3), pages 381-406, September.
    11. Catherine Haeck & Frank Verboven, 2012. "The Internal Economics of a University: Evidence from Personnel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(3), pages 591-626.
    12. Rob Euwals & Melanie Ward, "undated". "The Remuneration of British Academics," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 00/7, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    13. Ehrenberg, R.G.Ronald G., 2004. "Econometric studies of higher education," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 19-37.
    14. Alexis Walckiers, 2008. "Multi-dimensional contracts with task-specific productivity: an application to universities," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 15(2), pages 165-198, April.
    15. William J. Moore & Robert J. Newman & M. Dek Terrell, 2002. "Academic Economists' Pay and Productivity: A Tale of Two Countries," Departmental Working Papers 2002-16, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    16. Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 2002. "Studying Ourselves: The Academic Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 8965, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Euwals, Rob & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie, 2000. "What Matters Most: Teaching or Research? Empirical Evidence on the Remuneration of British Academics," CEPR Discussion Papers 2628, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    18. Euwals, Rob & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2000. "The Remuneration of British Academics," IZA Discussion Papers 178, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Ragan Jr, James F. & Warren, John T. & Bratsberg, Bernt, 1999. "How similar are pay structures in 'similar' departments of economics?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 347-360, June.
    20. Nelson, Paul A. & Monson, Terry, 2006. "Research Funding, Experience, and Seniority in Academia," Review of Applied Economics, Review of Applied Economics, vol. 2(1).
    21. Barbezat, Debra A. & Donihue, Michael R., 1998. "Do faculty salaries rise with job seniority?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 239-244, February.
    22. Peter Navarro, 2015. "How Economics Faculty Can Survive (and Perhaps Thrive) in a Brave New Online World," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 155-176, Fall.
    23. Moore, William J & Newman, Robert J & Turnbull, Geoffrey K, 1998. "Do Academic Salaries Decline with Seniority?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 352-366, April.

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