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Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession

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  • Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E.

    () (European Central Bank)

Abstract

The academic profession is an occupation in which pay has fallen dramatically, resulting in the setting up of a Committee of Inquiry to examine both pay relativities and mechanisms for pay determination. This paper considers salary determination and the gender salary gap in the academic labour market drawing upon a particularly detailed data set of 900 academics from five traditional Scottish Universities. Results reveal an aggregate gender salary differential for academic staff of 15%. Most of this differential can, however, be explained by our model. Evidence suggests a limited opportunity for female academics to combine career and family, despite the flexibility of an academic job and emphasises the importance of mobility to the male career. Publication record, but not teaching ability, is found to be an important determinant of salary. The dominant contribution of rank to both the determination of female academic salaries and the gender salary gap suggests vastly differential opportunities for promotion faced by men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession," IZA Discussion Papers 64, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp64
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ioana Boiciuc, 2015. "The Effects of Fiscal Policy on Emerging Economies. A TVP- VAR Approach," South-Eastern Europe Journal of Economics, Association of Economic Universities of South and Eastern Europe and the Black Sea Region, vol. 13(1), pages 75-84.
    2. Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Your Everyday, Average Academic," IZA Discussion Papers 63, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Casey Warman & Frances Woolley & Christopher Worswick, 2006. "The Evolution of Male-Female Wages Differentials in Canadian Universities: 1970-2001," Working Papers 1099, Queen's University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; Academic labour market; salary;

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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