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The Evolution of Male-Female Wages Differentials in Canadian Universities: 1970-2001

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  • Warman, Casey
  • Woolley, Frances
  • Worswick, Christopher

Abstract

In this paper, we use a unique data set containing detailed information on all fulltime teachers at Canadian universities over the period 1970 through 2001. The individual level data are collected by Statistics Canada from all universities in Canada and are used to analyze the evolution of male-female wage differentials of professors in Canadian universities. The long time series aspect of this data source along with the detailed administrative information allow us to provide a more complete and more accurate portrait of the wage gap than is available in most other studies. The results of a cohortbased analysis indicate that the male salary advantage among university faculty has declined for more recent birth cohorts. This has been driven not so much by an increase in the real salaries of female professors but from a cross cohort decline in the earnings of male professors and the fact that female professors have not experienced a similar cross cohort decline. Also important to note is the fact that the differences across cohorts appear to be permanent. There is no clear pattern of changes in these cohort differences with age.

Suggested Citation

  • Warman, Casey & Woolley, Frances & Worswick, Christopher, 2006. "The Evolution of Male-Female Wages Differentials in Canadian Universities: 1970-2001," Queen's Economics Department Working Papers 273575, Queen's University - Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:quedwp:273575
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Economics; International Development;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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