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Gender differences in the propensity to apply for promotion: evidence from the Italian Scientific Qualification

Author

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  • Maria De Paola
  • Michela Ponzo
  • Vincenzo Scoppa

Abstract

We analyse gender differences in the propensity to apply for academic promotion credentials in Italy exploiting a new national credential granting system with randomly assigned committee members. Controlling for productivity and a number of individual and field characteristics, we find that women have a lower probability of applying for promotion of about 4 percentage points. The determinants of this gap seem to be gender differences in risk-aversion and self-confidence as well as women’s fear of discrimination: the lower tendency to apply is especially relevant for women in the lower tail of the distribution of scientific productivity and in fields in which productivity is not easily measurable; furthermore, women are less likely to apply for promotion in fields in which promotions of women in the past were rare.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria De Paola & Michela Ponzo & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2017. "Gender differences in the propensity to apply for promotion: evidence from the Italian Scientific Qualification," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 986-1009.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:4:p:986-1009.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Manuela Stranges & Daniele Vignoli & Alessandra Venturini, 2019. "Comparison Is The Thief Of Joy. Does Social Comparison Affect Migrants’ Subjective Well-Being?," Working Papers 201906, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    2. Manuela Stranges & Daniele Vignoli & Alessandra Venturini, 2019. "“Comparison is the thief of joy†. Does social comparison affect migrants’ subjective well-being?," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2019_03, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    3. repec:cog:socinc:v:7:y:2019:i:1:p:90-100 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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