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Male Gatekeepers Gender Bias in the Publishing Process?

Author

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  • Bransch, Felix

    () (Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)

  • Kvasnicka, Michael

    () (Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)

Abstract

Using data on articles published in the top-five economic journals in the period 1991 to 2010, we explore whether the gender composition of editorial boards is related to the publishing success of female authors and to the quality of articles that get published. Our results show that female editors reduce, rather than increase, the share of articles that are (co-)authored by females. We also find evidence that female editors benefit article quality at low levels of representation on editorial boards, but harm article quality at higher levels. Several robustness checks corroborate these findings. Our results are broadly consistent with existing evidence on the behavior of gender-mixed hiring committees and of relevance for gender equality policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Bransch, Felix & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2017. "Male Gatekeepers Gender Bias in the Publishing Process?," IZA Discussion Papers 11089, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11089
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Manuel Bagues & Mauro Sylos-Labini & Natalia Zinovyeva, 2017. "Does the Gender Composition of Scientific Committees Matter?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1207-1238, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shoshana Grossbard & Tansel Yilmazer & Lingrui Zhang, 2018. "The Gender Gap in Citations: Lessons from Demographic Economics Journals," Working Papers 2018-078, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Card, David & DellaVigna, Stefano & Funk, Patricia & Iriberri, Nagore, 2019. "Are Referees and Editors in Economics Gender Neutral?," CEPR Discussion Papers 13789, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Hengel, E., 2017. "Publishing while Female. Are women held to higher standards? Evidence from peer review," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1753, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender bias; citations; journals; editors;

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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