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Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)?

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  • Jason Abrevaya

    (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

    (University of Texas at Austin, Maastricht University, IZA, and NBER)

Abstract

Using a very large sample of matched author-referee pairs, we examine how referees' and authors' genders affect the referees' recommendations. Relying on changing author-referee matches, we find no evidence of gender differences among referees in charitableness, nor is there any effect of the interaction between the referees' and authors' genders. With substantial laboratory research showing gender differences in fairness, the results suggest that outside the laboratory, an ethos of objectivity can overcome possible tendencies toward same-group favoritism or opposite-group discrimination. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Jason Abrevaya & Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2012. "Charity and Favoritism in the Field: Are Female Economists Nicer (To Each Other)?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(1), pages 202-207, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:94:y:2012:i:1:p:202-207
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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