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Gender Differences in Job Entry Decisions: A University-Wide Field Experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Anya Samek

The gender difference in competitiveness has been cited as an important factor driving the gender gap in labor market outcomes. Using a natural field experiment with 35,000 university students, I explore the impact of compensation scheme on willingness to apply for a job. I find that competitive compensation schemes disproportionately deter women from applying, which cannot be explained by differences in risk preferences alone. I also vary whether the job is introduced as helping a non-profit, which increases application rates, suggesting a role for social preferences in application decisions. Finally, I observe a correlation between competitiveness preferences and career choice.

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Paper provided by The Field Experiments Website in its series Natural Field Experiments with number 00419.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:feb:natura:00419
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.fieldexperiments.com

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