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Gender gaps in the evaluation of research: evidence from submissions to economics conferences (Updated March 2020)

Author

Listed:
  • Laura Hospido

    (Banco de España and IZA)

  • Carlos Sanz

    (Banco de España)

Abstract

We study gender differences in the evaluation of submissions to economics conferences. Using data from the Annual Congress of the European Economic Association (2015-2017), the Annual Meeting of the Spanish Economic Association (2012-2017), and the Spring Meeting of Young Economists (2017), we find that all-female-authored papers are 3.3 p.p. (6.8%) less likely to be accepted than all-male-authored papers. This gap is present after controlling for number of authors of the paper; referee fixed effects; field; cites of the paper; authors’ previous publication record, affiliations, and experience; and connections between the authors of a given paper and the referees that evaluate it. We provide evidence suggesting that the gap is driven by stereotypes against female authors: it is entirely driven by male referees, only exists for lesser-known authors, and seems larger in more masculine fields, especially in finance.

Suggested Citation

  • Laura Hospido & Carlos Sanz, 2019. "Gender gaps in the evaluation of research: evidence from submissions to economics conferences (Updated March 2020)," Working Papers 1918, Banco de España, revised Mar 2020.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:1918
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosTrabajo/19/Fich/dt1918e.pdf
    File Function: Updated version, March 2020
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    Cited by:

    1. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Pham, Tho & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2021. "Conference presentations and academic publishing," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 228-254.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; economics profession; academic labor market;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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