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Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing

Author

Listed:
  • Yuriy Gorodnichenko

    (University of California, Berkeley)

  • Tho Pham

    (University of Reading)

  • Oleksandr Talavera

    () (University of Birmingham)

Abstract

We quantify the contribution of conferences to publication success of more than 4,000 papers presented at three leading economics conferences over the 2006-2012 period. We show a positive link between conference presentation and the publishing probability in high-quality journals. Participating in major conferences is also associated with improved metrics for other measures of academic success such as the number of citations or abstract views. While the results are broadly similar across fields, annual meetings of the American Economic Association are particularly valuable in these dimensions. We also find that female authors appear to gain less from conferences than male authors.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tho Pham & Oleksandr Talavera, 2019. "Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing," Discussion Papers 19-10, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
  • Handle: RePEc:bir:birmec:19-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    conferences; publishing outcomes; research visibility; professional development; gender effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • O39 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Other

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