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Does Online Availability Increase Citations? Theory and Evidence from a Panel of Economics and Business Journals

Author

Listed:
  • Mark J. McCabe

    () (Boston University, University of Michigan, and Visiting Scholar at OFCE and SKEMA Business School)

  • Christopher M. Snyder

    () (Dartmouth College and National Bureau of Economic Research)

Abstract

Does online availability boost citations? Using a panel of citations to economics and business journals, we show that the enormous effects found in previous studies were an artifact of their failure to control for article quality, disappearing once fixed effects are added as controls. The absence of aggregate effects masks heterogeneity across platforms: JSTOR has a uniquely large effect, boosting citations around 10%. We examine other sources of heterogeneity, including whether JSTOR disproportionately increases cites from developing countries or to “long-tail” articles. Our theoretical analysis informs the econometric specification and allows citation increases to be translated into welfare terms. © 2015 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Suggested Citation

  • Mark J. McCabe & Christopher M. Snyder, 2015. "Does Online Availability Increase Citations? Theory and Evidence from a Panel of Economics and Business Journals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(1), pages 144-165, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:97:y:2015:i:1:p:144-165
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    1. DREZE, Jacques & ESTEVAN, Fernanda, 2006. "Research and higher education in economics: can we deliver the Lisbon objectives ?," CORE Discussion Papers 2006051, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    2. Erik Brynjolfsson & Yu (Jeffrey) Hu & Duncan Simester, 2011. "Goodbye Pareto Principle, Hello Long Tail: The Effect of Search Costs on the Concentration of Product Sales," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 57(8), pages 1373-1386, August.
    3. Papke, Leslie E. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2008. "Panel data methods for fractional response variables with an application to test pass rates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 145(1-2), pages 121-133, July.
    4. Michel Lubrano & Luc Bauwens & Alan Kirman & Camelia Protopopescu, 2003. "Ranking Economics Departments in Europe: A Statistical Approach," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(6), pages 1367-1401, December.
    5. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "A journal ranking for the ambitious economist," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue may, pages 127-140.
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    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark J. McCabe & Frank Mueller-Langer, 2019. "Does Data Disclosure Increase Citations? Empirical Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Leading Economics Journals," JRC Working Papers on Digital Economy 2019-02, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Frank Mueller-Langer & Marc Scheufen & Patrick Waelbroeck, 2018. "Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries? Empirical Evidence from Article-Level Data," JRC Working Papers on Digital Economy 2018-05, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. Alessio J. G. Brown & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2017. "Three decades of publishing research in population economics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 11-27, January.
    4. Gershenson, Seth & Polikoff, Morgan S. & Wang, Rui, 2019. "When Paywall Goes AWOL: The Demand for Open Access Education Research," IZA Discussion Papers 12158, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:2:p:931-954 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:eee:iepoli:v:48:y:2019:i:c:p:40-47 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Pham, Tho & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2019. "Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing," IZA Discussion Papers 12573, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Iman Tahamtan & Askar Safipour Afshar & Khadijeh Ahamdzadeh, 2016. "Factors affecting number of citations: a comprehensive review of the literature," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 107(3), pages 1195-1225, June.
    9. Thelwall, Mike, 2016. "The discretised lognormal and hooked power law distributions for complete citation data: Best options for modelling and regression," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 336-346.
    10. Mueller-Langer, Frank & Scheufen, Marc & Waelbroeck, Patrick, 2017. "Does Online Access Promote Research in Developing Countries?," Discussion Papers in Economics 31973, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    11. Dilger, Alexander & Klus, Milan F., 2019. "Success factors of academic journals in the digital age," Discussion Papers of the Institute for Organisational Economics 6/2019, University of Münster, Institute for Organisational Economics.
    12. Kosteas, Vasilios D., 2015. "Journal impact factors and month of publication," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 77-79.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    citations; online availability; economics journals; business journals; JSTOR; heterogeneity; welfare terms;

    JEL classification:

    • A29 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Other
    • M00 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - General - - - General

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