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Determinants of Scholarly Productivity Among Male and Female Economists


  • Garey C. Durden
  • Patricia Gaynor
  • Kellie Maske


A model of the determinants of articles produced by male and female economists is estimated using data from a survey of members of the American Economics Association. Years of experience, coauthorship rates, gender, research-teaching orientation of the respondent's institution, and teaching loads are shown to be important estimators. Coauthorship appears to increase the overall production of articles and may help explain why collaboration among economists has increased in recent years. Males produce, on average, about seven more articles than females, with approximately 59% of gender-specific differentials left unexplained by the variables included in the model. (JEL JØ) Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • Garey C. Durden & Patricia Gaynor & Kellie Maske, 2002. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity Among Male and Female Economists," Working Papers 02-12, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  • Handle: RePEc:apl:wpaper:02-12

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. El Ouardighi, Fouad & Kogan, Konstantin & Vranceanu, Radu, 2013. "Publish or teach? Analysis of the professor's optimal career path," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1995-2009.
    2. Oliver Fabel & Miriam Hein & Robert Hofmeister, 2008. "Research Productivity in Business Economics: An Investigation of Austrian, German and Swiss Universities," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9, pages 506-531, November.
    3. De Witte, Kristof & Rogge, Nicky & Cherchye, Laurens & Van Puyenbroeck, Tom, 2013. "Economies of scope in research and teaching: A non-parametric investigation," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 305-314.
    4. J. Paul Elhorst & Katarina Zigova, 2011. "Evidence of Competition in Research Activity among Economic Department using Spatial Econometric Techniques," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2011-04, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    5. Sabharwal, Meghna & Hu, Qian, 2013. "Participation in university-based research centers: Is it helping or hurting researchers?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1301-1311.
    6. van Praag, Mirjam C. & van Praag, Bernard M. S., 2007. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (and not Z)," IZA Discussion Papers 2673, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. William W. Olney, 2017. "English Proficiency And Labor Market Performance: Evidence From The Economics Profession," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 202-222, January.
    8. Eduardo A. Haddad & Jesus P. Mena-Chalco, Otávio J.G. Sidone, 2016. "Produção Científica e Redes de Colaboração dos Docentes Vinculados aos Programas de Pós-graduação em Economia no Brasil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2016_10, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    9. Colleen Manchester & Debra Barbezat, 2013. "The Effect of Time Use in Explaining Male–Female Productivity Differences Among Economists," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 53-77, January.
    10. Snell, Clete & Sorensen, Jon & Rodriguez, John J. & Kuanliang, Attapol, 2009. "Gender differences in research productivity among criminal justice and criminology scholars," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 288-295, May.
    11. Raúl Ramos & Vicente Royuela & Jordi Suriñach, 2007. "An analysis of the determinants in Economics and Business publications by Spanish universities between 1994 and 2004," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 71(1), pages 117-144, April.
    12. C. Mirjam Van Praag & Bernard M.S. Van Praag, 2008. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (rather than Z)," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 782-796, November.
    13. repec:spr:scient:v:85:y:2010:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-010-0263-z is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Mirjam van Praag & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2006. "First Author Determinants: An Empirical Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-045/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    15. Rogge, Nicky & De Witte, Kristof, 2009. "To publish or not to publish? On the aggregation and drivers of research performance," Working Papers 2009/42, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
    16. repec:hal:journl:hal-00823514 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Fouad El Ouardighi & Konstantin Kogan & Radu Vranceanu, 2013. "Publish or Teach ? : Analysis of the Professor's Optimal Career Plan," Working Papers hal-00823514, HAL.
    18. Mehmet Ali Koseoglu, 2016. "Mapping the institutional collaboration network of strategic management research: 1980–2014," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(1), pages 203-226, October.
    19. Chin-Chang Tsai & Elizabeth A. Corley & Barry Bozeman, 2016. "Collaboration experiences across scientific disciplines and cohorts," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(2), pages 505-529, August.
    20. repec:spr:scient:v:85:y:2010:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-010-0286-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. repec:eme:aecozz:s0731-905320160000037016 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Peter Burridge & J. Paul Elhorst & Katarina Zigova, 2016. "Group Interaction in Research and the Use of General Nesting Spatial Models," Advances in Econometrics,in: Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables, volume 37, pages 223-258 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    23. Sascha Friesike & Bastian Widenmayer & Oliver Gassmann & Thomas Schildhauer, 2015. "Opening science: towards an agenda of open science in academia and industry," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 581-601, August.
    24. repec:spr:scient:v:103:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-015-1574-x is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General


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