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Patricia Ellen Gaynor

Personal Details

First Name:Patricia
Middle Name:Ellen
Last Name:Gaynor
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pga749
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Appalachian State University

Boone, North Carolina (United States)
http://economics.appstate.edu/

: 828-262-2148
828-262-6105
Thelma C. Raley Hall, Boone, North Carolina 28608
RePEc:edi:deappus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2014. "Publishing in The Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy and an Evaluation (via Citation Counts) of JRAP’s Influence on Scholarship in Regional Science," Working Papers 14-07, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  2. Garey C. Durden & Richard J. Cebula & Patricia Gaynor, 2007. "The Impact of Social Conditioning (Internal Motivation) on the Probability of Voting," Working Papers 07-05, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  3. Todd L. Cherry & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2005. "Sex Discrimination in Faculty Salaries: Evidence from Economics," Working Papers 05-18, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
  4. Garey C. Durden & Patricia Gaynor & Kellie Maske, 2002. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity Among Male and Female Economists," Working Papers 02-12, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.

Articles

  1. Durden, Garey C. & Gaynor, Patricia E., 2015. "Publishing in The Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy and an Evaluation (via Citation Counts) of JRAP’s Influence on Scholarship in Regional Science," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(2).
  2. Todd L Cherry & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2011. "Individual and institutional determinants of the male female wage gap among U.S. economics faculty," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 245-254.
  3. Richard J. Cebula & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2008. "The Impact of the Repeat-Voting-Habit Persistence Phenomenon on the Probability of Voting in Presidential Elections," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 429-440, October.
  4. Kellie L. Maske & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2003. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity among Male and Female Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(4), pages 555-564, October.
  5. Garey Durden & Patricia Gaynor, 2000. "Relative changes in gender and race-based earnings costs, 1970-1995," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(6), pages 401-404.
  6. Patricia E. Gaynor & Garey C. Durden, 1997. "The Cost of Being Nonwhite and the Added Cost of Being Female in The South and Southwest," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 27(2), pages 195-209, Fall.
  7. Natalie Brem & Garey Durden & Patricia Gaynor, 1989. "The Effect of Government Employment on Income Inequality Overall and in the South: Evidence from Congressional District Data," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 19(2), pages 40-47, Spring.
  8. Garey Durden & Patricia Gaynor, 1987. "The rational behavior theory of voting participation: Evidence from the 1970 and 1982 elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 231-242, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Garey C. Durden & Patricia Gaynor & Kellie Maske, 2002. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity Among Male and Female Economists," Working Papers 02-12, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.

    Cited by:

    1. Raul Ramos & Vicente Royuela & Jordi Suriñach, 2006. "An analysis of the determinants in economics and business publications by spanish universities between 1994 and 2004," IREA Working Papers 200602, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Dec 2006.
    2. Chin-Chang Tsai & Elizabeth A. Corley & Barry Bozeman, 2016. "Collaboration experiences across scientific disciplines and cohorts," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(2), pages 505-529, August.
    3. Mirjam van Praag & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2007. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (and not Z)," CESifo Working Paper Series 1948, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. El Ouardighi, Fouad & Kogan, Konstantin & Vranceanu , Radu, 2013. "Publish or Teach ? : Analysis of the Professor's Optimal Career Plan," ESSEC Working Papers WP1307, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
    5. De Witte, Kristof & Rogge, Nicky & Cherchye, Laurens & Van Puyenbroeck, Tom, 2013. "Economies of scope in research and teaching: A non-parametric investigation," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 305-314.
    6. Sabharwal, Meghna & Hu, Qian, 2013. "Participation in university-based research centers: Is it helping or hurting researchers?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1301-1311.
    7. De Witte, K. & Rogge, N., 2010. "To publish or not to publish? On the aggregation and drivers of research performance," Working Papers 33, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
    8. Peter Burridge & J. Paul Elhorst & Katarina Zigova, 2016. "Group Interaction in Research and the Use of General Nesting Spatial Models," Advances in Econometrics,in: Spatial Econometrics: Qualitative and Limited Dependent Variables, volume 37, pages 223-258 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. William W. Olney, 2015. "English Proficiency and Labor Market Performance: Evidence from the Economics Profession," Department of Economics Working Papers 2015-05, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    10. C. Mirjam Van Praag & Bernard M.S. Van Praag, 2008. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (rather than Z)," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 782-796, November.
    11. Sascha Friesike & Bastian Widenmayer & Oliver Gassmann & Thomas Schildhauer, 2015. "Opening science: towards an agenda of open science in academia and industry," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 581-601, August.
    12. J. Paul Elhorst & Katarina Zigova, 2011. "Evidence of Competition in Research Activity among Economic Department using Spatial Econometric Techniques," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2011-04, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
    13. Colleen Manchester & Debra Barbezat, 2013. "The Effect of Time Use in Explaining Male–Female Productivity Differences Among Economists," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 53-77, January.
    14. Snell, Clete & Sorensen, Jon & Rodriguez, John J. & Kuanliang, Attapol, 2009. "Gender differences in research productivity among criminal justice and criminology scholars," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 288-295, May.
    15. Tahereh Dehdarirad & Anna Villarroya & Maite Barrios, 2015. "Research on women in science and higher education: a bibliometric analysis," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 103(3), pages 795-812, June.
    16. El Ouardighi, Fouad & Kogan, Konstantin & Vranceanu, Radu, 2013. "Publish or teach? Analysis of the professor's optimal career path," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1995-2009.
    17. Eduardo A. Haddad & Jesus P. Mena-Chalco, Otávio J.G. Sidone, 2016. "Produção Científica e Redes de Colaboração dos Docentes Vinculados aos Programas de Pós-graduação em Economia no Brasil," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2016_10, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    18. Oliver Fabel & Miriam Hein & Robert Hofmeister, 2008. "Research Productivity in Business Economics: An Investigation of Austrian, German and Swiss Universities," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9, pages 506-531, November.
    19. Cheng-Chung Cho & Ming-Wen Hu & Meng-Chun Liu, 2010. "Improvements in productivity based on co-authorship: a case study of published articles in China," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 85(2), pages 463-470, November.
    20. Mirjam van Praag & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2006. "First Author Determinants: An Empirical Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-045/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    21. Mehmet Ali Koseoglu, 2016. "Mapping the institutional collaboration network of strategic management research: 1980–2014," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 109(1), pages 203-226, October.
    22. Kristof Witte & Nicky Rogge, 2010. "To publish or not to publish? On the aggregation and drivers of research performance," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 85(3), pages 657-680, December.

Articles

  1. Richard J. Cebula & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2008. "The Impact of the Repeat-Voting-Habit Persistence Phenomenon on the Probability of Voting in Presidential Elections," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 429-440, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon, 2012. "Dodging the vote?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 325-343, February.
    2. Richard J. Cebula & Gigi M. Alexander, 2017. "Female Labor Force Participation and Voter Turnout: Evidence from the American Presidential Elections," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 8(2).
    3. Megan E. Hansen & William F. Shughart & Ryan M. Yonk, 2017. "Political Party Impacts on Direct Democracy: the 2015 Greek Austerity Referendum," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 45(1), pages 5-15, March.

  2. Kellie L. Maske & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2003. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity among Male and Female Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(4), pages 555-564, October.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Patricia E. Gaynor & Garey C. Durden, 1997. "The Cost of Being Nonwhite and the Added Cost of Being Female in The South and Southwest," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 27(2), pages 195-209, Fall.

    Cited by:

    1. Ewing, Bradley T. & Levernier, William, 2000. "An Analysis of Rural-Urban Differences in Average Family Income: An Application of the Oaxaca and Cotton-Neumark Decomposition Technique," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 30(3), pages 299-314, Winter.

  4. Natalie Brem & Garey Durden & Patricia Gaynor, 1989. "The Effect of Government Employment on Income Inequality Overall and in the South: Evidence from Congressional District Data," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 19(2), pages 40-47, Spring.

    Cited by:

    1. William B. Levernier, 1996. "The Role Of Region-Specific Institutionalized Cultural Characteristics On Income Inequality In The American South: The Case Of Georgia'S Plantation Belt," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(3), pages 301-316, Winter.

  5. Garey Durden & Patricia Gaynor, 1987. "The rational behavior theory of voting participation: Evidence from the 1970 and 1982 elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 231-242, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Richard J. Cebula & Gigi M. Alexander, 2017. "Female Labor Force Participation and Voter Turnout: Evidence from the American Presidential Elections," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 8(2).
    2. Garey C. Durden & Richard J. Cebula & Patricia Gaynor, 2007. "The Impact of Social Conditioning (Internal Motivation) on the Probability of Voting," Working Papers 07-05, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    3. Richard J. Cebula & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2008. "The Impact of the Repeat-Voting-Habit Persistence Phenomenon on the Probability of Voting in Presidential Elections," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 429-440, October.
    4. Christine Fauvelle-Aymar & Abel François, 2015. "Mobilization, cost of voting and turnout: a natural randomized experiment with double elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(1), pages 183-199, January.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2007-05-19
  2. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2007-05-19
  3. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2007-05-19
  4. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2007-05-19

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