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The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (rather than Z)

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  • C. MIRJAM VAN PRAAG
  • BERNARD M.S. VAN PRAAG

Abstract

Alphabetical name ordering on multi‐authored academic papers, which is the convention in economics and various other disciplines, is to the advantage of people whose last name initials are placed early in the alphabet. Professor A, who has been a first author more often than Professor Z, will have published more articles and experienced a faster productivity rate over the course of her career as a result of reputation and visibility. Authors know that name ordering matters and take ordering seriously. Several characteristics of an author‐group composition determine the decision to deviate from the default alphabetical name order to a significant extent.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Mirjam Van Praag & Bernard M.S. Van Praag, 2008. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (rather than Z)," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 782-796, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:econom:v:75:y:2008:i:300:p:782-796
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0335.2007.00653.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Matthias Weber, 2016. "The Effects of Listing Authors in Alphabetical Order: A survey of the Empirical Evidence," Bank of Lithuania Occasional Paper Series 12, Bank of Lithuania.
    3. Jurajda, Stepán & Münich, Daniel, 2010. "Admission to selective schools, alphabetically," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1100-1109, December.
    4. Abramo, Giovanni & D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea, 2017. "Does your surname affect the citability of your publications?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 121-127.
    5. Kerl, Alexander & Miersch, Enrico & Walter, Andreas, 2018. "Evaluation of academic finance conferences," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 26-38.
    6. William W. Olney, 2017. "English Proficiency And Labor Market Performance: Evidence From The Economics Profession," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 202-222, January.
    7. Tolga Yuret, 2016. "Does alphabetization significantly affect academic careers?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 108(3), pages 1603-1619, September.
    8. Goodman, Joshua Samuel & Goodman, Lucas & Goodman, Sarena & Goodman, Allen C., 2014. "A Few Goodmen: Surname-Sharing Co-Authors in Economics," Scholarly Articles 22805379, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    9. Kadel, Annke & Walter, Andreas, 2015. "Do scholars in Economics and Finance react to alphabetical discrimination?," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 64-68.
    10. Lixing Li & Xiaoyu Wu & Yi Zhou, 2021. "Intra-household bargaining power, surname inheritance, and human capital accumulation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 34(1), pages 35-61, January.
    11. Ong, David & Chan, Ho Fai & Torgler, Benno & Yang, Yu (Alan), 2018. "Collaboration incentives: Endogenous selection into single and coauthorships by surname initial in economics and management," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 41-57.
    12. Levitt, Jonathan M. & Thelwall, Mike, 2013. "Alphabetization and the skewing of first authorship towards last names early in the alphabet," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 575-582.
    13. Frandsen, Tove Faber & Nicolaisen, Jeppe, 2010. "What is in a name? Credit assignment practices in different disciplines," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 608-617.
    14. Fairclough, Ruth & Thelwall, Mike, 2015. "More precise methods for national research citation impact comparisons," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 895-906.
    15. Li, Ang & Li, Ben, 2021. "Alphabetic norm and research output," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 185(C), pages 50-60.
    16. Oswald, Andrew J., 2008. "Can We Test for Bias in Scientific Peer-Review?," IZA Discussion Papers 3665, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    17. Allen C. Goodman & Joshua Goodman & Lucas Goodman & Sarena Goodman, 2015. "A Few Goodmen: Surname-Sharing Economist Coauthors," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(2), pages 1392-1395, April.
    18. Waltman, Ludo, 2012. "An empirical analysis of the use of alphabetical authorship in scientific publishing," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 700-711.
    19. Ana Marušić & Lana Bošnjak & Ana Jerončić, 2011. "A Systematic Review of Research on the Meaning, Ethics and Practices of Authorship across Scholarly Disciplines," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 6(9), pages 1-1, September.
    20. Vanclay, Jerome K., 2013. "Factors affecting citation rates in environmental science," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 265-271.

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