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The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (and not Z)

Author

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  • C. Mirjam van Praag

    () (University of Amsterdam)

  • Bernard M.S. van Praag

    () (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Alphabetic name ordering on multi-authored academic papers_new, which is the convention in theeconomics discipline and various other disciplines, is to the advantage of people whose lastname initials are placed early in the alphabet. As it turns out, Professor A, who has been afirst author more often than Professor Z, will have published more articles and experienced afaster growth rate over the course of her career as a result of reputation and visibility.Moreover, authors know that name ordering matters and indeed take ordering seriously:Several characteristics of an author group composition determine the decision to deviatefrom the default alphabetic name order to a significant extent. This discussion paper has been published in Economica , 75(300), 782-96.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Mirjam van Praag & Bernard M.S. van Praag, 2007. "The Benefits of Being Economics Professor A (and not Z)," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 07-048/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20070048
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Hudson, 1996. "Trends in Multi-authored Papers in Economics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 153-158, Summer.
    2. David N. Laband & Robert D. Tollison, 2000. "Intellectual Collaboration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 632-661, June.
    3. Kellie L. Maske & Garey C. Durden & Patricia E. Gaynor, 2003. "Determinants of Scholarly Productivity among Male and Female Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(4), pages 555-564, October.
    4. Laband, David N., 2002. "Contribution, attribution and the allocation of intellectual property rights: economics versus agricultural economics," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 125-131, February.
    5. Maxim Engers & Joshua S. Gans & Simon Grant & Stephen King, 1999. "First-Author Conditions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(4), pages 859-883, August.
    6. Kissan Joseph & David N. Laband & Vivek Patil, 2005. "Author Order and Research Quality," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 545-555, January.
    7. Hamermesh, Daniel S & Biddle, Jeff E, 1994. "Beauty and the Labor Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1174-1194, December.
    8. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    9. Matthias Sutter & Martin Kocher, 2004. "Patterns of co-authorship among economics departments in the USA," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(4), pages 327-333.
    10. Liran Einav & Leeat Yariv, 2006. "What's in a Surname? The Effects of Surname Initials on Academic Success," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 175-187, Winter.
    11. Moore, William J & Newman, Robert J & Turnbull, Geoffrey K, 2001. "Reputational Capital and Academic Pay," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(4), pages 663-671, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Oswald, Andrew J., 2008. "Can We Test for Bias in Scientific Peer-Review?," IZA Discussion Papers 3665, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Efthyvoulou, Georgios, 2008. "Alphabet Economics: The link between names and reputation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1266-1285, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    performance measurement; incentives; economists; name ordering;

    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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