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Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing

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  • Yuriy Gorodnichenko
  • Tho Pham
  • Oleksandr Talavera

Abstract

We quantify the contribution of conferences to publication success of more than 4,000 papers presented at three leading economics conferences over the 2006-2012 period. We show a positive link between conference presentation and the publishing probability in high-quality journals. Participating in major conferences is also associated with improved metrics for other measures of academic success such as the number of citations or abstract views. While the results are broadly similar across fields, annual meetings of the American Economic Association are particularly valuable in these dimensions. We also find that female authors appear to gain less from conferences than male authors.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Tho Pham & Oleksandr Talavera, 2019. "Conference Presentations and Academic Publishing," NBER Working Papers 26240, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:26240
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    Cited by:

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    2. Marcus Biermann, 2021. "Remote talks: changes to economics seminars during Covid-19," CEP Discussion Papers dp1759, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Wojciech Charemza & Michal Lewandowski & Lukasz Wozny, 2021. "Efficiency in rewarding academic journal publications. The case of Poland," Working Papers 2021-062, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of Economic Analysis.
    4. Asier Minondo, 2020. "Comments are welcome," Papers 2001.08376, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2020.

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    JEL classification:

    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • O29 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Other

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