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Gender and Promotion in the Economics Profession

Author

Listed:
  • John M. McDowell
  • Larry D. Singell Jr.
  • James P. Ziliak

Abstract

The authors use unique panel data on American Economic Association members to test for gender differences in promotion in a profession with a well-defined promotion and job hierarchy and in which men and women exhibit similar labor-market attachment. The results suggest that over the period from the 1960s through the early 1980s, female economists had lower levels of professional attainment and career advancement than did their male colleagues with similar attributes. These gender differences remain in evidence despite controls for unobserved heterogeneity and self-selection between academic and non-academic jobs. There is evidence, however, that promotion prospects for female economists significantly improved during the 1980s, not only at all ranks, but also within both Ph.D.-granting institutions and non-Ph.D.-granting institutions. In fact, the results reveal no unexplained gender-specific differences in promotion by the end of the 1980s.

Suggested Citation

  • John M. McDowell & Larry D. Singell Jr. & James P. Ziliak, 2001. "Gender and Promotion in the Economics Profession," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 54(2), pages 224-244, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:54:y:2001:i:2:p:224-244
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    Cited by:

    1. Clément Bosquet & Pierre‐Philippe Combes & Cecilia García‐Peñalosa, 2019. "Gender and Promotions: Evidence from Academic Economists in France," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(3), pages 1020-1053, July.
    2. Ana Maria Takahashi & Shingo Takahashi & Thomas Maloney, 2015. "Gender salary and promotion gaps in Japanese academia: Results from science and engineering," Discussion Papers 1522, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    3. Fakhraddin Maroofi & Seyed Hamid Mahdiun & Jamshid Taghsimi, 2017. "The Role of Human Capital Within the University Administration," International Journal of Asian Social Science, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 7(2), pages 169-181, February.
    4. Karen Mumford & Cristina Sechel, 2017. "Pay, Rank and Job Satisfaction amongst Academic Economists in the UK," Discussion Papers 17/17, Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Lamia E. Kandil, 2015. "Disentangling qualitative and quantitative central bank influence," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-02, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    6. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:6:p:1550-1563 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mumford, Karen A. & Sechel, Cristina, 2019. "Pay and Job Rank Amongst Academic Economists in the UK: Is Gender Relevant?," IZA Discussion Papers 12397, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Bosquet, Clément & Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia, 2013. "Gender and competition: evidence from academic promotions in France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. John T. Addison & Orgul Demet Ozturk & Si Wang, 2014. "The Role of Gender in Promotion and Pay over a Career," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(3), pages 280-317.
    10. Takahashi, Ana Maria & Takahashi, Shingo, 2015. "Gender promotion differences in economics departments in Japan: A duration analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 1-19.
    11. Pema, Elda & Mehay, Stephen, 2010. "The role of job assignment and human capital endowments in explaining gender differences in job performance and promotion," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 998-1009, December.
    12. Bukstein, Daniel & Gandelman, Néstor, 2019. "Glass ceilings in research: Evidence from a national program in Uruguay," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(6), pages 1550-1563.
    13. Anne Boring, 2015. "Gender Biases in student evaluations of teachers," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-13, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    14. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:4:p:986-1009. is not listed on IDEAS

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