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The Role of Gender in Promotion and Pay over a Career

Author

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  • John T. Addison

    () (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, Department of Economics and Finance, Durham University Business School, and GEMF, University of Coimbra)

  • Orgul D. Ozturk

    (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina)

  • Si Wang

    (Department of Economics, Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina)

Abstract

Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79), this paper considers the role of gender in promotion and subsequent earnings development and how this evolves over a career. In its use of three career stages, the study builds on earlier work using the NLSY79 that considers gender differences in the early career years alone. The raw data suggest reasonably favorable promotion outcomes for females over a career. But the advantages seem to be confined to less-educated females. And while there are strong returns to education for males through enhanced promotion probability and attendant wage growth in later career this is not the case for females. Although this latter finding is not inconsistent with fertility choices on the part of educated females, choice is seemingly only part of the explanation.

Suggested Citation

  • John T. Addison & Orgul D. Ozturk & Si Wang, 2014. "The Role of Gender in Promotion and Pay over a Career," GEMF Working Papers 2014-07, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
  • Handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2014-07.
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    File URL: http://www.uc.pt/feuc/gemf/working_papers/pdf/2014/gemf_2014-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:789-865 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(3), pages 789-865, September.
    3. repec:ces:ifosdt:v:71:y:2018:i:17:p:15-30 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:spr:empeco:v:54:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00181-017-1264-z is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mohsen Javdani & Andrew McGee, 2019. "Moving Up or Falling Behind? Gender, Promotions, and Wages in Canada," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 189-228, April.
    6. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(3), pages 789-865, September.
    7. repec:spr:jlabre:v:40:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s12122-018-9277-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Abrar Reshid, Abdulaziz, 2017. "The gender gap in early career wage growth: the role of Children, job mobility and occupational mobility," Working Paper Series 2017:5, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    9. Gutierrez, Federico H., 2018. "Reaching the Top or Falling Behind? The Role of Occupational Segregation in Women's Chances of Finding a High-Paying Job Over the Life-Cycle," GLO Discussion Paper Series 273, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    10. repec:eee:jbrese:v:91:y:2018:i:c:p:159-168 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    promotion; earnings; early/mid/peak career; gender; public sector; private sector.;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J51 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Trade Unions: Objectives, Structure, and Effects
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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