IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hrv/faseco/2955768.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Belief Flipping in a Dynamic Model of Statistical Discrimination

Author

Listed:
  • Fryer, Roland

Abstract

The literature on statistical discrimination shows that ex-ante identical groups may be differentially treated in discriminatory equilibria. This paper constructs a dynamic model of statistical discrimination and explores what happens to the individuals who nonetheless overcome the initial discrimination. If an employer discriminates against a group of workers in her initial hiring, she may actually favor the successful members of that group when she promotes from within the firm. The worker's welfare implications (i.e. who benefits from an employer's discriminatory hiring practices) are unclear. Even though agents face discrimination initially, some may be better off because of it.

Suggested Citation

  • Fryer, Roland, 2007. "Belief Flipping in a Dynamic Model of Statistical Discrimination," Scholarly Articles 2955768, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:2955768
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dash.harvard.edu/bitstream/handle/1/2955768/belief%20flipping.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rune V. Lesner, 2016. "Testing for Statistical Discrimination based on Gender," Economics Working Papers 2016-07, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    2. Thomas Breda & Son Thierry Ly, 2012. "Do professors really perpetuate the gender gap in science? Evidence from a natural experiment in a French higher education institution," Working Papers halshs-00677438, HAL.
    3. Richard Chisik, 2015. "Job market signalling, stereotype threat and counter-stereotypical behaviour," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 48(1), pages 155-188, February.
    4. Anders Frederiksen & Timothy Halliday, 2015. "Why are there so few Women in Executive Positions? An Analysis of Gender Differences in the Life-Cycle of Executive Employment," Working Papers 2015-6, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    5. Paul M. Guest, 2016. "Executive Mobility and Minority Status," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 604-631, October.
    6. Lamia E. Kandil, 2015. "Disentangling qualitative and quantitative central bank influence," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-02, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    7. Sonia Bhalotra & Irma Clots-Figueras & Lakshmi Iyer, "undated". "Pathbreakers? Women’s Electoral Success and Future Political Participation," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-277, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    8. Kevin Lang & Jee-Yeon K. Lehmann, 2012. "Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market: Theory and Empirics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(4), pages 959-1006, December.
    9. Sue H. Mialon & Seung Han Yoo, 2014. "Employers' Preference for Discrimination," Emory Economics 1402, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    10. Lehmann, Jee-Yeon, 2011. "Job assignment and promotion under statistical discrimination: evidence from the early careers of lawyers," MPRA Paper 33466, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. John T. Addison & Orgul Demet Ozturk & Si Wang, 2014. "The Role of Gender in Promotion and Pay over a Career," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(3), pages 280-317.
    12. Ozerturk, Saltuk, 2016. "Minority perception of exclusion and promotion hurdles," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 55-59.
    13. Thomas Breda & Son Thierry Ly, 2012. "Do professors really perpetuate the gender gap in science? Evidence from a natural experiment in a French higher education institution," PSE Working Papers halshs-00677438, HAL.
    14. Prasad Krishnamurthy & Aaron Edlin, 2014. "Affirmative Action and Stereotypes in Higher Education Admissions," NBER Working Papers 20629, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. repec:eee:jeborg:v:136:y:2017:i:c:p:141-160 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Cassidy, Hugh & DeVaro, Jed & Kauhanen, Antti, 2016. "Promotion signaling, gender, and turnover: New theory and evidence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 126(PA), pages 140-166.
    17. Thomas Breda & Son Thierry Ly, 2012. "Do Professors Really Perpetuate the Gender Gap in Science? Evidence from a Natural Experiment in a French Higher Education Institution," CEE Discussion Papers 0138, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    18. Gürtler, Oliver, 2015. "Promotion signaling, discrimination, and positive discrimination policies," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113005, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Guha, Brishti & Roy Chowdhury, Prabal, 2017. "Affirmative Action in the Presence of a Creamy Layer: Identity or Class Based?," MPRA Paper 78686, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Kato, Takao & Kodama, Naomi, 2017. "Women in the Workplace and Management Practices: Theory and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 10788, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    21. Lamia Kandil, 2015. "Glass ceiling and belief flipping : theory and evidence from Egypt," Sciences Po publications 2015-02, Sciences Po.
    22. Song Han, 2011. "Creditor Learning and Discrimination in Lending," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 40(1), pages 1-27, October.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hrv:faseco:2955768. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Office for Scholarly Communication). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deharus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.