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Gender and Racial Discrimination in Pay and Promotion for NHS Nurses

Author

Listed:
  • Pudney, Stephen

    (ISER, University of Essex)

  • Shields, Michael A.

    (Monash University)

Abstract

For many years the NHS has been subject to allegations that gender and racial discrimination are a feature of the internal labour market for qualified nurses. This paper examines this issue with regard to the promotion process using 1994 survey data. We start by rejecting the assumption of covariate exogeneity inherent in the ordered probit model. A full simultaneous model is then developed which has important consequences for estimates of the influence of gender, ethnicity, training and career interruptions. We find evidence of significant differences in speed of promotion between gender and ethnic groups, which imply large differences in career earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Pudney, Stephen & Shields, Michael A., 1999. "Gender and Racial Discrimination in Pay and Promotion for NHS Nurses," IZA Discussion Papers 85, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp85
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Pudney & Michael Shields, 2000. "Gender, race, pay and promotion in the British nursing profession: estimation of a generalized ordered probit model," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 367-399.
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    7. Shields, Michael A & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1999. "Ethnic Differences in the Incidence and Determinants of Employer-Funded Training in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 46(5), pages 523-551, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2000. "Discretionary Measures of Active Labor Market Policy: The German Employment Promotion Reform in Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 182, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    ordered probit models; Nursing; ethnicity; endogeneity; gender; promotions;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

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