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Racial Harassment, Job Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession

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  • Michael A. Shields

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  • Stephen Wheatley Price

Abstract

We investigate the determinants of perceived racial harassment at the workplace, and its impact on job satisfaction and quitting behaviour among ethnic minority nurses, using data from a unique large-scale survey of British NHS nurses. Nearly 40% of ethnic minority nurses report experiencing racial harassment from work colleagues, while more than 64% report suffering racial harassment from patients. Such racial harassment is found to lead to a significant reduction in job satisfaction, which, in turn, increases nurses' intentions to quit their job. These results are found to be robust to endogeneity concerns, and have important policy implications for retaining qualified nursing staff in the NHS. Copyright 2002 by The London School of Economics and Political Science
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  • Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, "undated". "Racial Harassment, Job Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession," Discussion Papers in Public Sector Economics 01/2, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:lpserc:01/2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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