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High Performance Workplace Practices and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from Europe

  • Bauer, Thomas K.

    ()

    (RWI)

Using individual data from the European Survey on Working Conditions (ESWC) covering all EU member states, this study aimed at contributing to our understanding of the effects of High Performance Workplace Organizations (HPWOs) on worker's job satisfaction. The estimation results show that a higher involvement of workers in HPWOs is associated with higher job satisfaction. This positive effect is dominated by the involvement of workers in flexible work systems, indicating that workers particularly value the opportunities associated with these systems, such as an increased autonomy over how to perform their tasks, and increased communication with co-workers. Being involved in team work and job rotations as well as supporting human resource practices appear to contribute relatively little to the increased job satisfaction from being involved in HPWOs.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1265.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2004
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: RWI-Mitteilungen, 2003/2004, 54/55 (1), 57-85
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1265
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