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Job satisfaction and quit intentions of offshore workers in the UK North Sea oil and gas industry

  • Heather Dickey
  • Verity Watson
  • Alexandros Zangelidis

The North Sea oil and gas industry currently faces recruitment and retention difficulties due to a shortage of skilled workers. The vital contribution of this sector to the U.K. economy means it is crucial for companies to focus on retaining existing employees. One means of doing this is to improve the job satisfaction of workers. In this paper, we investigate the determinants of job satisfaction and intentions to quit within the U.K. North Sea oil and gas industry. We analyse the effect of personal and workplace characteristics on the job satisfaction and quit intentions of offshore employees. The data used were collected using a self-completed questionnaire. Job satisfaction was analysed using an ordinal probit model and quit intentions were analysed using a binary probit model. 321 respondents completed the questionnaire. We find that respondents in good financial situations, those whose skills are closely related to their job, and those who received training reported higher levels of job satisfaction. Furthermore, we establish the importance of job satisfaction, promotion prospects and training opportunities in determining workers’ intentions to quit the offshore oil and gas sector. To encourage better retention, companies should seek to adopt policies that focus not only on pay but also provide promotion and training opportunities aimed at investing in their employees’ skills development.

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Article provided by Scottish Economic Society in its journal Scottish Journal of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 58 (2011)
Issue (Month): 5 (November)
Pages: 607-633

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Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:58:y:2011:i:5:p:607-633
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