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Timing, togetherness and time windfalls


  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

    () (Department of Economics, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-1173 USA)


With appropriate data the analysis of time use, labor supply and leisure can move beyond the standard questions of wage and income elasticities of hours supplied. I present four examples: 1) American data from 1973 through 1997 show that the amount of evening and night work in the U.S. has decreased. 2) The same data demonstrate that workers whose relative earnings increase experience a relative diminution of the burden of work at unpleasant times. 3) U.S. data for the 1970s and 1990s demonstrate that spouses' work schedules are more synchronized than would occur randomly; synchrony among working spouses diminished after the 1970s; and the full-income elasticity of demand for it was higher among wives than among husbands in the 1970s but equal in the 1990s. 4) Dutch time-budget data for 1990 show that the overwhelming majority of the windfall hour that occurred when standard time resumed was used for extra sleep.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2002. "Timing, togetherness and time windfalls," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 15(4), pages 601-623.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:15:y:2002:i:4:p:601-623
    Note: Received: 6 July 2000/Accepted: 20 January 2001

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Douglas Wilson, 1990. "Are Efficiency Improvements In Government Transfer Policies Self-Defeating In Political Equilibrium?," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 241-258, November.
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    More about this item


    Leisure; time use; work amenities;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General


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