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Job autonomy and job satisfaction: new evidence

  • J Taylor
  • S Bradley
  • A N Nguyen

This paper investigates the impact of perceived job autonomy on job satisfaction. We use the fifth sweep of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (1988-2000), which contains personally reported job satisfaction data for a sample of individuals eight years after the end of compulsory education. After controlling for a wide range of personal and job-related variables, perceived job autonomy is found to be a highly significant determinant of five separate domains of job satisfaction (pay, fringe benefits, promotion prospects, job security and importance / challenge of work).

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File URL: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/media/lancaster-university/content-assets/documents/lums/economics/working-papers/JobAutonomy.pdf
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Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 541528.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:541528
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  23. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette, 1999. "Job satisfaction and preference drift1," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 363-367, June.
  24. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
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  26. Peter Sloane & Melanie Ward, 2001. "Cohort effects and job satisfaction of academics," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(12), pages 787-791.
  27. Philippe Moguerou, 2002. "Job satisfaction among US Ph.D. graduates: the effects of gender and employment sector," Labor and Demography 0204002, EconWPA.
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  29. Meg G Birdseye & John S Hill, 1995. "Individual, Organizational/Work and Environmental Influences on Expatriate Turnover Tendencies: An Empirical Study," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(4), pages 787-813, December.
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