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Job autonomy and job satisfaction: new evidence

Author

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  • J Taylor
  • S Bradley
  • A N Nguyen

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of perceived job autonomy on job satisfaction. We use the fifth sweep of the National Educational Longitudinal Study (1988-2000), which contains personally reported job satisfaction data for a sample of individuals eight years after the end of compulsory education. After controlling for a wide range of personal and job-related variables, perceived job autonomy is found to be a highly significant determinant of five separate domains of job satisfaction (pay, fringe benefits, promotion prospects, job security and importance / challenge of work).

Suggested Citation

  • J Taylor & S Bradley & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Job autonomy and job satisfaction: new evidence," Working Papers 541528, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:541528
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    File URL: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/media/lancaster-university/content-assets/documents/lums/economics/working-papers/JobAutonomy.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. José Vieira & João Couto & Maria Teresa Borges-Tiago, 2004. "Wages and Job Satisfaction in Portugal," ERSA conference papers ersa04p667, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Koražija Maja & Šarotar Žižek Simona & Mumel Damijan, 2016. "The Relationship between Spiritual Intelligence and Work Satisfaction among Leaders and Employees," Naše gospodarstvo/Our economy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 62(2), pages 51-60, June.
    3. Sarah Holly & Alwine Mohnen, 2012. "Impact of Working Hours on Work-Life Balance," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 465, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Sánchez Cañizares, Sandra Mª & Artacho Ruiz, Carlos & Fuentes García, Fernando J. & López-Guzmán Guzmán,Tomás J., 2007. "Análisis de los determinantes estructurales de la satisfacción laboral. Aplicación en el sector educativo/Analizing the Structural Determinants of Job Satisfaction. An Application in the Educational F," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 25, pages 887-900, Diciembre.
    5. Irene A. Boateng & Samuel Kanyandewe & Mary Sassah, 2014. "Organizational Climate a Tool for Achieving Employees Job Satisfaction in Ghanaian Manufacturing Firms," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 4(9), pages 166-177, September.
    6. repec:hur:ijarbs:v:7:y:2017:i:10:p:41-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Vieira, José A. Cabral, 2005. "Skill mismatches and job satisfaction," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 39-47, October.
    8. Ana-Maria Godeanu, 2012. "The antecedents of satisfaction with pay in teams: do performance-based compensation and autonomy keep team-members satisfied?," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 145-168, June.
    9. A I Petrescu & R Simmons & S Bradley, 2004. "The impacts of human resource management practices and pay inequality on workers' job satisfaction," Working Papers 542602, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

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    Keywords

    Job; autonomy; satisfaction; pay; gender; promotion;

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