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How well do theories of job matching explain variations in job satisfaction across education levels? Evidence for UK graduates

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  • Clive Belfield
  • R. D. F. Harris

Abstract

Using ordered probit estimation technique this paper examines the job satisfaction of recent UK graduates. Focussing primarily on explaining job satisfaction in terms of individuals matching to jobs, with the match depending on reservation returns, information sets and job offer rates. Only limited support can be found for the argument that job matching explains higher job satisfaction. In addition, stylizing graduates as a peer group, who form satisfaction levels based on their rankings relative to each other we examine whether or not education quality, which raises peer group status and increases the job offer rate, is systematically related to job satisfaction. The results broadly support the hypothesis that job satisfaction is neutral across graduates of different education qualities. However, our specification tests indicate that ordered probit estimation may not be fully appropriate for identifying the characteristics of those with high job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Clive Belfield & R. D. F. Harris, 2002. "How well do theories of job matching explain variations in job satisfaction across education levels? Evidence for UK graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 535-548.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:5:p:535-548
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840110041895
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Devine, Theresa J. & Kiefer, Nicolas M., 1991. "Empirical Labor Economics: The Search Approach," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195059366.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saziye Gazioglu & Aysit Tansel, 2006. "Job satisfaction in Britain: individual and job related factors," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1163-1171.
    2. repec:lan:wpaper:1022 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Aysit Tansel & Saziye Gazîoglu, 2014. "Management-employee relations, firm size and job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(8), pages 1260-1275, October.
    4. Gianni Betti & Antonella D’Agostino & Laura Neri, 2011. "Educational Mismatch of Graduates: a Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 103(3), pages 465-480, September.
    5. Garcia-Serrano, Carlos, 2008. "Does size matter? The influence of firm size on working conditions and job satisfaction," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-30, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Husam Sadig, 2014. "Determinants Of Subjective Job Satisfaction In Developing Countries: Contrasting Managers And Regular Employees," Economy & Business Journal, International Scientific Publications, Bulgaria, vol. 8(1), pages 1250-1255.
    7. Albiol, Judit & Díaz Serrano, Lluís & Teruel, Mercedes, 2014. "Is Self-employment a Way to Escape from Skill Mismatches?," Working Papers 2072/247652, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    8. Sánchez Cañizares, Sandra Mª & Artacho Ruiz, Carlos & Fuentes García, Fernando J. & López-Guzmán Guzmán,Tomás J., 2007. "Análisis de los determinantes estructurales de la satisfacción laboral. Aplicación en el sector educativo/Analizing the Structural Determinants of Job Satisfaction. An Application in the Educational F," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 25, pages 887-900, Diciembre.
    9. Halvarsson, Daniel & Tingvall, Patrik, 2017. "The Impact of Employing Mismatched Workers on Firm Productivity, Wages and Profits," Ratio Working Papers 291, The Ratio Institute.
    10. Lucie Davoine & Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2008. "A Taxonomy of European Labour Markets Using Quality Indicators," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00317280, HAL.
    11. Martin Ryan & Liam Delaney & Colm Harmon, 2009. "Enhancing the comparability of self-rated skills-matching using anchoring vignettes," Open Access publications 10197/2066, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    12. Albiol Sanchez, Judit & Diaz-Serrano, Luis & Teruel, Graciela, 2015. "Is Self-employment a Way to Escape from Skill Mismatches?," IZA Discussion Papers 9008, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Getinet A. Haile, 2015. "Workplace Job Satisfaction in Britain: Evidence from Linked Employer–Employee Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(3), pages 225-242, September.
    14. José Manuel Lasierra & José Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2016. "How does work management improve job satisfaction? Evidence from Spain," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(2), pages 1202-1213.
    15. Bender, Keith A. & Roche, Kristen, 2013. "Educational mismatch and self-employment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 85-95.
    16. Nguyen, Anh & Taylor, Jim & Bradley, Steve, 2003. "Relative pay and job satisfaction: some new evidence," MPRA Paper 1382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Eugenia Fabra Florit & Luis Vila Lladosa, 2007. "Evaluation of the Effects of Education on Job Satisfaction: Independent Single-Equation vs. Structural Equation Models," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 13(2), pages 157-170, May.
    18. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00317280 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Fabra, M. Eugenia & Camisón, Cesar, 2009. "Direct and indirect effects of education on job satisfaction: A structural equation model for the Spanish case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 600-610, October.
    20. Ángel Díaz-Chao & Pilar Ficapal-Cusí & Joan Torrent-Sellens, 2016. "Economic Crisis and Job Quality in Spain: A Multi-dimensional and Micro-data Empirical Approach," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(2), pages 613-633, January.
    21. Keith A. Bender & John S. Heywood, 2009. "Educational Mismatch among Ph.D.s: Determinants and Consequences," NBER Chapters,in: Science and Engineering Careers in the United States: An Analysis of Markets and Employment, pages 229-255 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Benjamin Artz, 2008. "Fringe Benefits and Job Satisfaction," Working Papers 08-03, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics.
    23. Fulvio Castellacci & Clara Viñas-Bardolet, 2017. "Internet use and job satisfaction," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20170126, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
    24. Vicente Royuela & Jordi Suriñach, 2013. "Quality of Work and Aggregate Productivity," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 37-66, August.
    25. Vieira, José A. Cabral, 2005. "Skill mismatches and job satisfaction," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 39-47, October.

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