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Combining Micro and Macro Unemployment Duration Data

  • van den Berg, Gerard J.

    ()

    (University of Mannheim)

  • van der Klaauw, Bas

    ()

    (VU University Amsterdam)

We combine micro and macro unemployment duration data to study the effects of the business cycle on the outflow from unemployment. We allow the cycle to affect individual exit probabilities of unemployed workers as well as the composition of the total inflow into unemployment. We estimate the model using (micro) survey data and (macro) administrative data from France. The distribution of the inflow composition is estimated along with the other parameters. The estimation method deals with differences between the micro and macro unemployment definitions. The results also show to what extent the unemployment duration distributions corresponding to the two definitions can be described by the same model

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 109.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2000
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Journal of Econometrics, 2001, 102 (2), 271-309
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp109
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  1. Baker, Michael, 1992. "Unemployment Duration: Compositional Effects and Cyclical Variability," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 313-21, March.
  2. Honore, Bo E, 1993. "Identification Results for Duration Models with Multiple Spells," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 241-46, January.
  3. Bean, Charles R, 1994. "European Unemployment: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 573-619, June.
  4. Magnac, Thierry, 2000. "Subsidised Training and Youth Employment: Distinguishing Unobserved Heterogeneity from State Dependence in Labour Market Histories," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(466), pages 805-37, October.
  5. Thierry Magnac, 1997. "State Dependence and Heterogeity in youth Employment Histories," Working Papers 97-47, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  6. Thierry Magnac & Michael Visser, 1999. "Transition Models With Measurement Errors," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 466-474, August.
  7. Michael R. Darby & John C. Haltiwanger & Mark W. Plant, 1985. "Unemployment-Rate Dynamics and Persistent Unemployment Under Rational Expectations," NBER Working Papers 1558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. van den Berg, Gerard J. & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2000. "Combining Micro and Macro Unemployment Duration Data," IZA Discussion Papers 109, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Michael Baker & Angelo Melino, 1999. "Duration Dependence and Nonparametric Heterogeneity: A Monte Carlo Study," Working Papers melino-99-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  10. Imbens, Guido W & Lancaster, Tony, 1994. "Combining Micro and Macro Data in Microeconometric Models," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(4), pages 655-80, October.
  11. Dynarski, Mark & Sheffrin, Steven M, 1990. "The Behavior of Unemployment Durations over the Cycle," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 350-56, May.
  12. Laisney, François & Lechner, Michael, 1993. "Combining panel data and macro information: an application to the estimation of a participation model," ZEW Discussion Papers 93-23, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  13. van den Berg, Gerard J, 1990. "Search Behaviour, Transitions to Nonparticipation and the Duration of Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(402), pages 842-65, September.
  14. repec:fth:inseep:9858 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Gallant, A Ronald & Nychka, Douglas W, 1987. "Semi-nonparametric Maximum Likelihood Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 363-90, March.
  16. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, March.
  17. Van den Berg, Gerard J., 2001. "Duration models: specification, identification and multiple durations," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 55, pages 3381-3460 Elsevier.
  18. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, June.
  19. Imbens, G W, 1994. "Transition Models in a Non-stationary Environment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(4), pages 703-20, November.
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