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Analysing Incomplete Individual Employment Histories Using Indirect Inference

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  • Magnac, Thierry
  • Robin, Jean-Marc
  • Visser, Michael

Abstract

In this paper we apply the Indirect Inference method to estimate the parameters of a semi-Markov transition model when the data are subject to a complex form of censoring. There is no explicit expression for the likelihood function, and therefore Maximum Likelihood estimation is computationally burdensome. The econometric methodology of Indirect Inference is first tested on simulated data under various assumptions about the distribution of spell durations and transitions. Then, it is applied to labor market transitions between self-employment, wage-work, and unemployment using the 1986-88 French labor force survey. Although the analysis is basically a reduced-form analysis, we motivate our transition model in terms of a structural search model. Copyright 1995 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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  • Magnac, Thierry & Robin, Jean-Marc & Visser, Michael, 1995. "Analysing Incomplete Individual Employment Histories Using Indirect Inference," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(S), pages 153-169, Suppl. De.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:10:y:1995:i:s:p:s153-69
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    Cited by:

    1. Nakamura, Emi & Zerom, Dawit, 2008. "Accounting for Incomplete Pass-Through," MPRA Paper 14389, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bo E. Honoré & Áureo de Paula, 2016. "A new model for interdependent durations with an application to joint retirement," CeMMAP working papers CWP07/16, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    3. GOBILLON Laurent & SELOD Harris, 2007. "The effects of segregation and spatial mismatch on unemployment: evidence from France," Research Unit Working Papers 0702, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
    4. Bo Honoré & Áureo de Paula, 2011. "Interdependent Durations in Joint Retirement," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2011-5, Center for Retirement Research, revised Feb 2011.
    5. Sauer, Robert M. & Taber, Christopher, 2017. "Indirect Inference with Importance Sampling: An Application to Women's Wage Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 11004, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Andrey Launov & Klaus Wälde, 2013. "Estimating Incentive And Welfare Effects Of Nonstationary Unemployment Benefits," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54, pages 1159-1198, November.
    7. van den Berg, Gerard J. & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2001. "Combining micro and macro unemployment duration data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 271-309, June.
    8. repec:eee:econom:v:205:y:2018:i:1:p:177-203 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Fatih Guvenen & Anthony A. Smith, 2014. "Inferring Labor Income Risk and Partial Insurance From Economic Choices," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82, pages 2085-2129, November.
    10. Bruins, Marianne & Duffy, James A. & Keane, Michael P. & Smith, Anthony A., 2018. "Generalized indirect inference for discrete choice models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 205(1), pages 177-203.
    11. Berg, Gerard J. van den & Klaauw, Bas van der, 1998. "Combining micro and macro unemployment data," Serie Research Memoranda 0041, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    12. Mark Yuying An & Ming Liu, 2000. "Using Indirect Inference To Solve The Initial-Conditions Problem," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(4), pages 656-667, November.
    13. Melissa Tartari, 2006. "Divorce and the cognitive achievement of children," 2006 Meeting Papers 32, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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