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How does work management improve job satisfaction? Evidence from Spain

Author

Listed:
  • José Manuel Lasierra

    () (University of Zaragoza (Spain))

  • José Alberto Molina

    () (University of Zaragoza (Spain) and IZA (Germany))

  • Raquel Ortega

    () (University of Zaragoza (Spain))

Abstract

Our purpose is to analyze the influence of organizational and psycho-social practices on job satisfaction in Spain. Our hypothesis maintains that modern businesses organize work providing greater well-being for the worker, with the understanding that requiring a more cooperative attitude from the worker generates greater productivity. Using data from the Survey on the Quality of Life on the Job, 2004, we select the determinants of job satisfaction. Our findings indicate that work appears to have intrinsic value, and that the variables related to human relationships, particularly, those corresponding to social and work relationships, have an influence on job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • José Manuel Lasierra & José Alberto Molina & Raquel Ortega, 2016. "How does work management improve job satisfaction? Evidence from Spain," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(2), pages 1202-1213.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-16-00100
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J8 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards

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