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Job Satisfaction in Britain: Individual and Job Related Factors

  • Saziye Gazioglu

    (Department of Economics, METU)

  • Aysit Tansel

    ()

    (Department of Economics, METU)

Recently there is a resurgence of interest in the analysis of job satisfaction variables. Job satisfaction is correlated with labor market behavior such as productivity, quits and absenteeism. Recent work examined job satisfaction in relation to various factors. In this paper four different measures of job satisfaction are related to a variety of personal and job characteristics. We use a unique data of 28 240 British employees Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS97). Our data set is larger and more recent than in the previous studies. The four measures of job satisfaction considered are satisfaction with influence over job, satisfaction with amount of pay, satisfaction with sense of achievement and satisfaction with respect from supervisors. Although the job satisfaction measures we use are somewhat different than those that are previously used in the literature, a number of results that are commonly obtained with international data are found to hold in our data set as well.

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File URL: http://www.erc.metu.edu.tr/menu/series03/0303.pdf
File Function: First version, 2003
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Paper provided by ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University in its series ERC Working Papers with number 0303.

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Length: 15 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2003
Date of revision: Apr 2003
Handle: RePEc:met:wpaper:0303
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  1. Louis Lévy-Garboua & Claude Montmarquette, 2004. "Reported job satisfaction : What does it mean?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00203197, HAL.
  2. Donna Brown & Steven McIntosh, 2003. "Job satisfaction in the low wage service sector," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(10), pages 1241-1254.
  3. Clark, A.E., 1995. "Job Satisfaction and Gender: Why Are Women so Happy at Work?," DELTA Working Papers 95-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  4. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
  5. Saziye Gazioglu & Aysit Tansel, 2003. "Job Satisfaction, Work Environment and Relations with Managers in Britain," ERC Working Papers 0304, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Apr 2003.
  6. Clive Belfield & R. D. F. Harris, 2002. "How well do theories of job matching explain variations in job satisfaction across education levels? Evidence for UK graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 535-548.
  7. George J. Borjas, 1979. "Job Satisfaction, Wages, and Unions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 21-40.
  8. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  9. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 135-41, May.
  10. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
  11. Clark, Andrew E., 1999. "Are wages habit-forming? evidence from micro data," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 179-200, June.
  12. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J. & Warr, Peter B., 1994. "Is job satisfaction u-shaped in age ?," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) 9407, CEPREMAP.
  13. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-59, May.
  14. Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Peter Sanfey, . "Job Satisfaction, Wage changes and Quits: Evidence from Germany," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 98-06, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  15. Miller, Paul W, 1990. "Trade Unions and Job Satisfaction," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(55), pages 226-48, December.
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