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Migration: an economic and social analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Glover, Stephen
  • Gott, Ceri
  • Loizillon, Anaïs
  • Portes, Jonathan
  • Price, Richard
  • Spencer, Sarah
  • Srinivasan, Vasanthi
  • Willis, Carole

Abstract

This study represents a major attempt to identify the overall economic and social outcomes of migration policy in the UK, both in theory and in practice. The evidence indicates that, whilst migrants constitute a very diverse set of people with different characteristics contributing in different ways to the UK economy and society, overall migration has the potential to deliver significant economic benefits. It also makes clear that the issues are complex, and the data incomplete. One of the primary purposes of producing this research study is to encourage debate and further serious research on how migration policy might be further developed in order to achieve the Government’s objective, to maximise the benefits of migration. This document has been prepared by the Home Office Economics and Resource Analysis Unit with assistance from the Performance and Innovation Unit in the Cabinet Office. It attempts to look at migration in the round: beginning with theory and background trends, proceeding to a discussion of the current policy framework in the context of the Government’s high level objectives, and examining the economic and social outcomes which current policy delivers and their contribution to those objectives. It concludes with suggestions for further research and analysis that will help to underpin future policy development in this area. This study is for discussion purposes only and does not constitute a statement of Government policy. In particular, this study is intended to be the start of a process of further research and debate – by identifying both what we know from existing data sources and analysis, and where further analysis is required. The impetus for this work came from a view that policy-oriented research and analysis about migration had not kept up with developments. This omission is particularly visible and important in the context of the debate about globalisation. While migration is an integral part of globalisation, many discussions of globalisation focus exclusively on trade, investment and capital flows, and ignore the movement of people. A good framework exists, both theoretical and policy-oriented, for thinking about globalisation when it comes to trade and capital flows. That framework recognises that globalisation is both inevitable – the UK cannot shut itself off from the rest of the world – and desirable – there are significant economic gains to be had. But it also recognises that a purely laissez-faire attitude would also be a mistake. Globalisation must be managed to maximise its helpful effects and to mitigate its downsides. To do that, Government needs to take an active and progressive role – not least in explaining the globalisation process, why it is happening, why it is beneficial and what Government is doing to manage it. However, that framework is not yet in place when it comes to migration. This report aims to help remedy that deficiency in the UK context, by providing an analytical framework for policy thinking on this topic. The analysis in this study is based on data and research on the UK’s current migrant population. Projections based on the current population are necessarily tentative, as future migrants may not be the same as those who are currently in the UK (and we know relatively little about the migrants who are currently here). This study is not intended to be a definitive statement on UK migration. Rather it attempts to identify what we know from existing data sources and analysis, and to outline areas where further analysis is required. In this way, this study aims to be the start of a process of further research and debate. There is a real need for more research in this area – indeed, it is striking how little research on migration there has been in the UK.

Suggested Citation

  • Glover, Stephen & Gott, Ceri & Loizillon, Anaïs & Portes, Jonathan & Price, Richard & Spencer, Sarah & Srinivasan, Vasanthi & Willis, Carole, 2001. "Migration: an economic and social analysis," MPRA Paper 75900, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:75900
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Hatton, 2002. "Why Has UK Net Immigration Increased?," CEPR Discussion Papers 457, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Timothy Hatton, 2005. "Explaining trends in UK immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 719-740, November.
    3. Hunt, Priscillia, 2008. "Are immigrants so stuck to the floor that the ceiling is irrelevant?," Economic Research Papers 269787, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    4. Dobra, Alexandra, 2009. "Principal concerns concentrating on the costs and benefits of immigration in developed countries," MPRA Paper 16817, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Dobra, Alexandra, 2009. "Identifying the key issues focusing on the costs and benefits of immigration in developed countries," MPRA Paper 16806, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "People Flows in Globalization," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 145-170, Spring.
    7. David Coleman, 2006. "Immigration and Ethnic Change in Low‐Fertility Countries: A Third Demographic Transition," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(3), pages 401-446, September.
    8. Stefano Staffolani & Enzo Valentini, 2010. "Does Immigration Raise Blue and White Collar Wages of Natives? The Case of Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 24(3), pages 295-310, September.
    9. Pinger, Pia R., 2007. "Come back or stay? - Spend here or there?: Temporary versus permanent migration and remittance patterns in the Republic of Moldova," Kiel Advanced Studies Working Papers 438, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Alexander Hijzen & Peter Wright, 2010. "Migration, trade and wages," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(4), pages 1189-1211, September.
    11. Camelia Anghel & Adina Claudia Neamtu & Liviu Neamtu, 2017. "Sustainable Development Versus Migration In Romania," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 2, pages 41-46, December.
    12. Williams, Fiona, 2011. "Towards a Transnational Analysis of the Political Economy of Care," SULCIS Working Papers 2011:6, Stockholm University, Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
    13. Larry Ray, 2002. "Crossing Borders? Sociology, Globalization and Immobility," Sociological Research Online, , vol. 7(3), pages 36-49, August.
    14. Linda Mcdowell & Adina Batnitzky & Sarah Dyer, 2009. "Precarious Work and Economic Migration: Emerging Immigrant Divisions of Labour in Greater London's Service Sector," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 3-25, March.
    15. Sam Scott, 2017. "Venues and Filters in Managed Migration Policy: The Case of the United Kingdom," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(2), pages 375-415, June.
    16. Stefano STAFFOLANI & Enzo VALENTINI, 2009. "Does Immigration Raise Blue and White Collar Wages of Natives?," Working Papers 330, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    17. Jonathan Levie, 2007. "Immigration, In-Migration, Ethnicity and Entrepreneurship in the United Kingdom," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 143-169, March.
    18. Linda McDowell & Adina Batnitzky & Sarah Dyer, 2008. "Internationalization and the Spaces of Temporary Labour: The Global Assembly of a Local Workforce," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 46(4), pages 750-770, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; globalisation; economic growth; productivity; social exclusion; social inclusion; policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F61 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Microeconomic Impacts
    • F62 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Macroeconomic Impacts
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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