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The More Things Change: Immigrants and Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s

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  • Card, D.
  • DiNardo, J.
  • Estes, E.

Abstract

Rising immigrant inflow have substantially affected the size and composition of the US workforce. They are also exerting an even bigger intergenerational effect: at present one-in-ten native born children are in the "second generation" - born to immigrant parents. In this paper we present a comparative perspective on the economic performance of immigrants and their children, utlizing data from the 1940 and 1970 Censuses, and from recent (1994-96) Current Population Surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Card, D. & DiNardo, J. & Estes, E., 1998. "The More Things Change: Immigrants and Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s," Papers 97-98-22, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:calirv:97-98-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    IMMIGRANTS ; GENERATIONS;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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