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The More Things Change: Immigrants and Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s

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Listed:
  • Card, D.
  • DiNardo, J.
  • Estes, E.

Abstract

Rising immigrant inflow have substantially affected the size and composition of the US workforce. They are also exerting an even bigger intergenerational effect: at present one-in-ten native born children are in the "second generation" - born to immigrant parents. In this paper we present a comparative perspective on the economic performance of immigrants and their children, utlizing data from the 1940 and 1970 Censuses, and from recent (1994-96) Current Population Surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Card, D. & DiNardo, J. & Estes, E., 1998. "The More Things Change: Immigrants and Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s," Papers 97-98-22, California Irvine - School of Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:calirv:97-98-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Alan Manning, 2010. "The Economic Situation of First and Second-Generation Immigrants in France, Germany and the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages 4-30, February.
    2. Luthra, Renee Reichl & Soehl, Thomas, 2014. "Who assimilates? Statistical artefacts and intergenerational mobility in immigrant families," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Manon Domingues dos Santos & François-Charles Wolff, 2009. "Human capital background and the educational attainment of the second-generation immigrants in France," Working Papers hal-00417879, HAL.
    4. Naci H. Mocan & Luiza Pogorelova, 2015. "Why Work More? The Impact of Taxes, and Culture of Leisure on Labor Supply in Europe," NBER Working Papers 21297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Naci Mocan & Luiza Pogorelova, 2015. "Why Work More? The Impact of Taxes, and Culture of Leisure on Labor Supply in Europe," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1514, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    6. Mocan, Naci & Pogorelova, Luiza, 2015. "Why Work More? The Impact of Taxes, and Culture of Leisure on Labor Supply in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 9281, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IMMIGRANTS ; GENERATIONS;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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