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Precarious Work and Economic Migration: Emerging Immigrant Divisions of Labour in Greater London's Service Sector

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  • LINDA MCDOWELL
  • ADINA BATNITZKY
  • SARAH DYER

Abstract

The aim of this article is to assess the connections between the continued expansion of forms of insecure work and the impact of rising numbers of economic migrants employed in UK labour markets. It shows how competition between foreign-born workers for jobs in the UK is currently being recast by changes in the jobs available, in forms of precarious labour market attachment and by new patterns of migration into the UK since EU expansion in 2004. The article documents the ways in which migrants with different sets of social characteristics (nationality, gender and skin colour) and different sets of legal entitlements (legal citizenship, EU membership and entitlement to residence) are differentially placed in their competition for some of the poorest jobs in the British economy, drawing on an empirical study of the migrant divisions of labour emerging in two significant sectors in the service industries. It concludes by arguing that new and deeper divisions are emerging between foreign-born workers in the UK. Copyright (c) 2009 The Authors. Journal Compilation(c) 2009 Joint Editors and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Linda Mcdowell & Adina Batnitzky & Sarah Dyer, 2009. "Precarious Work and Economic Migration: Emerging Immigrant Divisions of Labour in Greater London's Service Sector," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 3-25, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ijurrs:v:33:y:2009:i:1:p:3-25
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    1. Patricia Ehrkamp & Helga Leitner, 2006. "Rethinking immigration and citizenship: new spaces of migrant transnationalism and belonging," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 38(9), pages 1591-1597, September.
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    6. Jamie Peck & Nikolas Theodore, 1998. "The Business of Contingent Work: Growth and Restructuring in Chicago's Temporary Employment Industry," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 12(4), pages 655-674, December.
    7. Jamie Peck, 2001. "Contingent Chicago: Restructuring the Spaces of Temporary Labor," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 471-496, September.
    8. Timothy Hatton, 2005. "Explaining trends in UK immigration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 719-740, November.
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    10. Patrick McGovern, 2007. "Immigration, Labour Markets and Employment Relations: Problems and Prospects," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 217-235, June.
    11. Glover, Stephen & Gott, Ceri & Loizillon, Anaïs & Portes, Jonathan & Price, Richard & Spencer, Sarah & Srinivasan, Vasanthi & Willis, Carole, 2001. "Migration: an economic and social analysis," MPRA Paper 75900, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Catherine Harris & Dominique Moran & John R. Bryson, 2015. "Polish Labour Migration to the UK: Data Discrepancies, Migrant Distributions, and Indicators of Entrepreneurial Activity," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 196-217, June.
    2. Gordon L Clark, 2012. "Pensions or property?," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 44(5), pages 1185-1199, May.
    3. Gordon L. Clark, 2016. "The Components of Talent: Company Size and Financial Centres in the European Investment Management Industry," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(1), pages 168-181, January.
    4. repec:bla:tvecsg:v:107:y:2016:i:5:p:582-595 is not listed on IDEAS

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