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Explaining Trends in UK Immigration

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Abstract

Since the 1970s Britain has gone from being a country of net emigration to one of net immigration, with a trend increase in immigration of more than 100,000 per year. This paper represents the first attempt to model the variations in net migration for British and for foreign citizens, across countries and over time. A simple economic model, which includes the selection effects of differing income distributions at home and abroad, largely accounts for the variations in the data. The results suggest that, while improved economic performance in the UK relative to overseas has tended to increase immigration, rising UK inequality has had an even larger effect. Immigration policies at home and abroad have also increased net immigration, particularly in the 1990s

Suggested Citation

  • Tim Hatton, 2004. "Explaining Trends in UK Immigration," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2004-440, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:cbeeco:2004-440
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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