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Small Differences That Matter

Editor

Listed:
  • Card, David
  • Freeman, Richard B.

Abstract

This volume, the first in a new series by the National Bureau of Economic Research that compares labor markets in different countries, examines social and labor market policies in Canada and the United States during the 1980s. It shows that subtle differences in unemployment compensation, unionization, immigration policies, and income maintenance programs have significantly affected economic outcomes in the two countries. For example: -Canada's social safety net, more generous than the American one, produced markedly lower poverty rates in the 1980s. -Canada saw a smaller increase in earnings inequality than the United States did, in part because of the strength of Canadian unions, which have twice the participation that U.S. unions do. -Canada's unemployment figures were much higher than those in the United States, not because the Canadian economy failed to create jobs but because a higher percentage of nonworking time was reported as unemployment. These disparities have become noteworthy as policy makers cite the experiences of the other country to support or oppose particular initiatives.

Suggested Citation

  • Card, David & Freeman, Richard B. (ed.), 1993. "Small Differences That Matter," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226092836, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bknber:9780226092836
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mark D. Partridge, 2001. "Changes in U.S. and Canadian Wage Dynamics in the 1990s: How Unique Are Favorable U.S. Labor Market Developments?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 31(1), pages 71-93, Summer.
    2. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn & Joan Y. Moriarty & Andre Portela Souza, 2002. "The Role of the Family in Immigrants' Labor-Market Activity: Evidence from the United States," NBER Working Papers 9051, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 1-22 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • John M. Abowd & Richard B. Freeman, 1991. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 1-26 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
      • George J. Borjas & Richard B. Freeman, 1992. "Introduction and Summary," NBER Chapters,in: Immigration and the Workforce: Economic Consequences for the United States and Source Areas, pages 1-16 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Gindling, T.H. & Oviedo, Luis, 2008. "Female-headed single-parent households and poverty in Costa Rica," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.

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